The Tracks I’m Playing (Week of August 21, 2017)

As y’all know, there’s a solar eclipse happening today. I guess this is the universe’s way of trying to make a Monday exciting. I’m honestly scared of going blind so will probably not be going outside to watch it and will stick to watching it online. Lame, I know.

The Tracks I’m Playing

Townes Van Zandt- “Waiting Around to Die.” I know what you’re thinking and it’s probably something along the lines of, “come on, Brittany, this old song from 1968!?” Well, let me explain myself. I actually first heard this song thanks to Whitey Morgan and the 78’s who covered it on their 2015 album Sonic Ranch. However, as these things usually go, I found the original Townes Van Zandt version soon after and realized how amazing it is. So while this song may be old as dirt, it’s a classic and deserves recognition for being so. It also came in at number 31 on Rolling Stone‘s list of “40 Saddest Country Songs of All Time.” Even if the song might make you blue, I would still suggest that you go ahead and give it a listen, I mean, it’s easier than just waiting around to die!

Whitey Morgan and the 78’s- “Bad News.” Since I talked about Whitey above, it only seems fair to give him his own mention here…even if he is bad news everywhere he goes and always gettin’ in trouble and leaving them girls that hate to see him go. Slow your roll, Whitey!

Anderson East- “All On My Mind.” Though not “country” per se, this American rhythm and blues artist dates Miranda Lambert and is featured on the Southern Family album that I wrote about last week, so I see no issue with including him here. The rhythm and blues world that he’s a part of is not one that I had really tapped into before and shame on me because this guy is great and everything I’ve heard so far I really like. Take “Satisfy Me” and “Find ‘Em, Fool ‘Em and Forget ‘Em,” for example. Both are excellent songs!

Margo Price- “Four Years of Chances.” Whether it’s been four days, four weeks, four months, or in Margo’s case, four years, there’s a good chance that at some point you gave someone way too many chances. Hopefully you realized it before 1,461 days had passed by! My favorite thing about this song? When Margo sings the word, “chances.” She realizes she gave you several years too many of these and it can’t help but come through when she sings.

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats- “I Need Never Get Old.” Like with Anderson East, I’ve been exploring artists that I typically wouldn’t have since starting this blog and Nathaniel Rateliff is one of those. His sound is influenced by folk, Americana, and vintage rhythm and blues so I guess this places him somewhere in the middle. Whatever category you choose to place him in, I’m a fan. I particularly like the saxophone and trumpet that are found in this song. If you’re a fan and haven’t seen his performance of this song on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concerts series, I would suggest checking it out.

Sturgill Simpson- “It Ain’t All Flowers.” This song is from The Sturge’s album Metamodern Sounds in Country Music and it’s one of his many songs that I’m currently digging. I’m not 100% sure what a metamodern sound is, especially in regards to country music, but I feel like this song comes pretty close to being the epitome of what that sound might be. I’m slowly counting down the days until I see him in concert (25 days!) and making sure I’m prepared by listening to as much of him as I can. Needless to say, it’s been great!

“But it ain’t all flowers
Sometimes you gotta feel the thorns”

Thanks for the Shout Out, Mr. Hubbard!

Ray Wylie Hubbard- “Tell the Devil I’m Getting There as Fast as I Can.” Since I saw him in concert on Friday night and since his new album by the same name came out on Friday, it only makes since that Ray Wylie Hubbard is on this list. And Eric Church sings on this song, along with Lucinda Williams, so yeah, I’m including it!

Also, on Friday, August 18th at approximately 11:30 p.m., Ray Wylie Hubbard mentioned Beltway Boots while on stage at Hill Country BBQ in Washington, DC!!! I kid you not he actually mentioned “Beltway Boots” while on stage and said, “she’s supposed to be here tonight.” Well, I was definitely there and I definitely heard you mention Beltway Boots! That was pretty freakin’ awesome so thanks, Ray Wylie! I’ve finally achieved my 5 seconds of fame, y’all!

Apparently there’s no video up for this song on YouTube but if you wanna listen to it, I’ve added it to my Spotify playlist “The Tracks I’m Playing” where you can find all of the songs that I write about each week.

The Dime Store Cowgirl Birthday Girl 

And since today is this Dime Store Cowgirl’s birthday, Kacey Musgraves- “Good Ol’ Boys Club is also a track I’m playing. This is one of my favorite song of hers because it further affirms my longheld belief that trying to be a part of the good ol’ boys club just ain’t worth it! Cigars and handshakes? I appreciate ya but no thanks! Happy Birthday, Kacey!

“I don’t need a membership to validate
The hard work I put in and the dues I paid
Never been to good at just goin’ along
I guess I’ve always kind of been for the underdog”

Currently listening to: Bonnie Tyler- “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” Isn’t this what everyone is listening to today? Be sure to protect your eyes today people! I don’t want you to be singing “Blinded by the Light” when it’s all said and done.

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Friends I’ve Met through (Eric) Church

I hope everyone is having a great Sunday catching up with all of their Church friends! I’ve been catching up with some of my favorite people that I’ve met through Church and wanted to introduce y’all to some of these guys. These are all friends that I’ve met through Church, or rather, in Eric Church songs. If it hadn’t been for Church, me and these friends might’ve never met!

Without further ado, let’s get the introductions started!

My Friend Danny

On Mr. Misunderstood On the Rocks Live & (Mostly) Unplugged, Eric’s live album from his shows at Red Rocks Amphitheatre last summer, he includes a version of “Mistress Named Music,” which is the “Mistress Named Music-Red Rocks Medley.” In the middle of this song, he breaks out into Bob Seger, Loggins and Messina, Little Feat, Billy Joel, and George Strait, turning this song into an almost nine minute long medley with his musical idols weaved into the middle of it. One of the songs that he sings is “Danny’s Song” by Loggins and Messina off of their Sittin’ In album. Even though Eric only sings the chorus in this song, it was enough to make me wanna find the whole song. I instantly fell in love with this song and am so thankful that Danny (and his song) are now a part of my life.

It was also in this song that I met Lowell George, Bill Payne, Roy Estrada, and Richie Hayward aka the guys of Little Feat. Together me and these guys have gone from Tucson to Tucumcari, Tehachapi to Tonapah- the places mentioned in their song “Willin‘,” which Eric also sings in this medley.

My Voodoo Queen Friend Marie Laveau 

In “Devil, Devil (Prelude: Princess of Darkness)” Eric references Bobby Bare and it was through this song that he and I first met. And as Church connections usually go, Bobby Bare then introduced me to Marie Laveau. Now I’m not one to partake in Church gossip, but if I was, Marie Laveau would definitely be at the center of it. I mean, after all, she’s a voodoo queen who casts spells on men and makes them disappear. While she may be the topic of Church gossip, we could all use a friend who possesses the power to make people disappear, so I’m keeping her around!

My Red Headed Stranger Friend

It was at Church that I met a red headed stranger from Blue Rock, Montana. Over time, this stranger and I have become quite good friends and I’m happy to say that he’s no longer a stranger (nor a redhead as he’s mostly grey these days). The friend I’m talking about is none other than Willie Nelson. His album, “Red Headed Stranger” is one that Eric rediscovers during his “Record Year,” while also getting down with some James Brown. I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t know who was Willie Nelson was but learning about his discography, and specifically about the Red Headed Stranger album, was something that came from Church. If I could offer one piece of advice for getting to know my Red Headed Stranger friend, it would be “don’t cross him [and] don’t boss him!”

Eric also sings about New Grass Revival in “Record Year.” Apparently, I had found them years ago in the form of Garth Brooks’ “Callin’ Baton Rouge” and just didn’t know it. This is one of my favorite Garth songs (the live version, especially!) but I gotta give credit where credit is due because if it weren’t for NGR this song wouldn’t exist.

For more NGR, check out “In The Middle of the Night,” which I discovered on Eric’s Spotify playlist, “Round Here Buzz.”

My Misunderstood Friends

“Now, your buddies get their rocks off on Top 40 radio
But you love your daddy’s vinyl, old-time rock and roll
Elvis Costello, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and think Jeff Tweedy
Is one bad mother”

I wrote about Ray Wylie Hubbard in my post about finding the devil through Church. Ironically, he’s been one of my favorite people I’ve met through Church. Hubbard was mentioned in “Mr. Misunderstood” along with Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy. Of course I knew who Elvis Costello was before Eric name dropped him in “Mr. Misunderstood,” but despite knowing who he was, I never gave him much attention, that was until Eric convinced me to give him a fair chance. The first Elvis Costello song that I really came to like was “A Good Year for the Roses.” After looking this song up, it was easy to see why I liked this song so much- it was originally a country song, first sang by George Jones. From Church to Costello to The Possum, the connections I’ve made through Church have been endless!

While I’m still not sure if Jeff Tweedy is really one bad mother, I’ve been trying my hardest to get into Wilco, which has been Tweedy’s band since 1994. One Wilco song I’ve found that I really like is “Jesus, etc.” (fitting for Church, right?) It’s been said that Eric’s “Mr. Misunderstood” resembles a 1996 song from Wilco titled, “Misunderstood” in that it “matches a touch of melody and tempo” and shares themes found in this song. If Jeff Tweedy was the inspiration behind “Mr. Misunderstood,” then I guess he really is one bad mother.

I’m happy to have Tweedy join my group of misunderstood Church friends along with Costello and Hubbard. After all, Church is supposed to be about inclusion, right?

Are You Sure Eric Done It This Way? 

Eric’s Carolina album includes the song, “Lotta Boot Left to Fill,” in which he sings, “I don’t think Waylon done it this way, And if he was here he’d say Hoss neither did Hank.” This line is inspired by a Waylon Jennings song, “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way.” In these two songs, Waylon and Eric are each critical of the state of country music at the time of their writing and wonder about how their idols did things in their time. For Waylon, it was Hank Williams and for Eric it was Waylon Jennings that set the gold standard on how things should be done. I have no doubt that this song played a huge role in my love of Waylon Jennings that started years ago as it began around the same time that I saw Eric perform this song in concert back in 2011. Out of all of my Church friends, I’d have to say that Waylon and I are the closest. I mean, after all, ladies do love outlaws!

There’s already a song about about Eric’s music (Marc Leach’s “She Don’t Go To Church,” which I wrote about here) and I wouldn’t be surprised if years from now someone is singing, “Are You Sure Eric Done It This Way?”

That’s How I Got to Tom T. Hall, Bobby Bare, and Whitey Morgan

I mentioned in my post about Eric’s live performances that he often plays a song specific to the city that he’s in when he’s on tour. So when Eric performed in Southaven, Mississippi, which is just minutes outside of Memphis, it only made sense that “That’s How I Got to Memphis” was on the setlist. Originally sung by Tom T. Hall, this song has been covered by Bobby Bare, Whitey Morgan, Roseanne Cash, The Avett Brothers, Buddy Miller, and many others. I’m not sure how these guys got there, but Eric Church is how I got to Memphis. He’s also how I made some friends named Tom T. Hall, Bobby Bare, and Whitey Morgan.

Meeting Friends through Church Recommendations 

It hasn’t just been through his music that Eric has turned me on to new artists but also through his recommendations. In an interview Eric did with Bobby Bones three years ago (that I watched on YouTube in London- before I even knew who Bobby Bones was), Bobby asked what artists Eric liked and he gave the names Amos Lee and Brandy Clark. Immediately after, I gave each of these artists a listen and became fans of both. To this day, Amos Lee’s “Chill In the Air” is still one of my all-time favorite songs. I also found Brandy Clark’s “Stripes” which led me to her first album, 12 Stories. A few months later, after I had returned from London, Brandy was the opening act at an Eric Church concert that I attended and I made sure to meet her and get her autograph that night. My only regret about doing this was that I practically missed all of Dwight Yoakam’s performance while I was waiting in line to meet her. Sorry, Dwight!

Amos and Brandy are two examples of friends that I didn’t necessarily meet through Church but rather because Church recommended them to me.

Church Friends Ain’t Just for Sunday Mornings 

I knew that going to Church was good for you but I never knew it could lead to so many great friendships! Just look at all the awesome people I’ve added to my friends circle because of Church!

Though these might be my Church friends, I prefer seeing them on Friday nights, not Sunday mornings, so this coming Friday (8/18), I’ll be going to see Ray Wylie Hubbard at Hill Country BBQ in Washington, DC. Come on out if you’re in the area!

Currently listening to: Dwight Yoakam- “A Thousand Miles From Nowhere.” Sorry for missing your performance that one time, Dwight!

The Tracks I’m Playing (Week of June 26, 2017)

Happy Monday, everyone! To quote Mark Chesnutt, “Well it sure is Monday, isn’t it now? Gotta get myself through the week somehow.” Hopefully the songs below will help get you through your Monday and the rest of your week!

New Tracks

Miranda Lambert– Smoking Jacket.” I was unaware that I wanted this kind of man until Miranda made it clear with this song (thanks, girl!) I’ve been listening to her album The Weight of These Wings like crazy and “Smoking Jacket” is one of the many songs that I just can’t get enough of, which is probably because I have a huge crush on whoever this man is. He’s velvet and refined? Sign me up!

“I want a man with a smoking jacket and
A deeper pocket with money to burn
I want a man who knows his status
And he makes a habit of loving me till it hurts”

Other songs from The Weight of These Wings that I’ve been playing on repeat are “Highway Vagabond” and “Six Degrees of Separation.”

Steve Earle and The Dukes– “So You Wanna Be An Outlaw.” If I ever thought I was cut out to be an outlaw Steve Earle and Willie Nelson made sure to set me straight with this song. Living a life where you can never go home and you can’t trust anybody (not even your own momma) ain’t no life for me. This song is the title track from Earle’s latest album, which also features a duet with Earle and Miranda Lambert titled, “This Is How It Ends” that I highly recommend. (Not sure if y’all can tell but I love me some Miranda!)

“So you wanna be outlaw, better listen up kid
Steal a million dollars and you have to keep it hid
Ain’t no place to spend it in the desert if you did
And you can’t take it with you when you go”

Chris Stapleton– “Them Stems.” Let’s just get one thing straight- I’ve never smoked “them stems.” But I can totally sympathize with being in a bad, bad way, as Chris Stapleton describes it in this song, where it seems like nothing’s going right. I guess you could say that metaphorically I’ve smoked “them stems.” In any case, this song has a beat that’s sure to make you groove no matter how relatable you find its content.

“This morning I smoked them stems
Yeah, that’s the kinda shape I’m in
I’m in a bad, bad way again
‘Cause this morning I smoked them stems”

New to Me

Lori McKenna– “Salt.” It’s no surprise that the lyrics in a Lori McKenna song caught my attention. After all, this is the same lady who wrote “Humble and Kind,” which was a big hit for Tim McGraw and a song that I think will go down in country music history as one of the greatest songs of all time. I don’t think I’m alone in thinking this as this song won Song of the Year at the 2016 Country Music Awards, Best Country Song at the Grammy’s in 2017, and Favorite Country Song at the 2016 American Music Awards. I realize that I’m late to the Lori McKenna party as “Salt” came out in 2013 but better late than never! “Salt” is about leaving a man who ain’t worth a whole lot, as Lori lists out in this song, not even her weight in salt.

“But you ain’t worth the time
You ain’t worth the pain
You ain’t worth the spit in my mouth when I scream out your name
You ain’t worth the cost to repair the hole in the kitchen drywall
You ain’t worth the good advice written on a dirty bathroom stall
Or my weight in salt”

Whitey Morgan and the 78’s- I’m on Fire.” I’m a big fan of Bruce Springsteen so I was interested to see how Whitey Morgan and the 78’s chose to cover “I’m on Fire,” which was featured on their 2008 album Honky Tonks and Cheap Motels. While I do enjoy the country feel that his cover has, nothing beats the original Springsteen (sorry Whitey!) This isn’t the only time that Whitey Morgan has covered The Boss- his 2014 album Grandpa’s Guitar also features a version of “Highway Patrolman.”

For all you D.C. peeps- Whitey Morgan will be performing at the Fillmore in Silver Spring on July 19th. I’m afraid I’ll probably be too jetlagged to attend but y’all should go check him out!

“At night I wake up with the sheets soaking wet
And a freight train running through the
Middle of my head
Only you can cool my desire
I’m on fire”

Currently listening to: Mark Chesnutt- “It Sure Is Monday.” You ain’t lying, Mark!