The Tracks I’m Playing (Week of August 14, 2017)

As Steve Azar (a country artist of Syrian and Lebanese descent!! Say what?!) sings, “I don’t have to be me ’til Monday.” Well, it’s Monday so that means it’s back to the weekly routine. Thankfully, I’ve got the tracks below to keep me going this week.

The Tracks I’m Playing 

Tyler Childers- “Whitehouse Road.” Holy Kentucky Smokes this guy is some kinda good! And when you’ve got Sturgill Simpson producing your record, how could you not be? I’ve included the link above to Tyler’s OurVinyl Session version of his song “Whitehouse Road” but it’s also featured on his newly released album Purgatory. I’m excited to see what the future holds for Tyler- maybe an album with him AND Sturgill?! A girl can dream!

Miranda Lambert- “Sweet By and By and Morgane and Chris Stapleton- “You Are My Sunshine.” If you don’t have a southern family of your own, don’t worry, Miranda Lambert, Morgane and Chris Stapleton, Brent Cobb, Jamey Johnson, and Shooter Jennings will let you be a part of theirs with their compilation album, Southern Family, which features the two songs listed above. Other artists that are a part of this Southern Family include Brandy Clark, Anderson East, and Jason Isbell. Everyone could use a southern family to call their own and I couldn’t think of a better one than this!

Since we’re on the topic of Chris Stapleton, it’d be appropriate now to mention The Steeldrivers and their song If It Hadn’t Been For Love.” The Steeldrivers was Stapleton’s band from 2005-2010. If you’re a big fan of Stapleton, I would recommend checking these guys out, especially the stuff they recorded when he was part of the group.

Cody Jinks- “I’m Not the Devil.” Apparently long bearded men is the theme of today because here comes another one by the name of Cody Jinks. Cody is the real deal and one of the artists out there doing justice for country music with songs like “Loud and Heavy,” “Hippies and Cowboys,” and “I’m Not the Devil.” And for the record Cody, I don’t think you’re the devil!

“I’m not the devil you think that I am
It ain’t no excuse, but I’m just a man
I slipped and I fell, it got outta hand
But I’m not the devil you think that I am”

Jon Pardi- “Heartache On The Dance Floor.” Let’s get this Pardi started! I’ve been head over boots for this California cowboy for quite some time. Not only am I digging the boots and cowboy hat look but I’m also digging the music this guy is putting out. See also: “Head Over Boots” and “Dirt On My Boots.

Brandy Clark- “Daughter.” The ultimate revenge is karma- you get to sit back and let the universe work its magic and that’s just what Brandy Clark plans on doing in this song. She’s just waiting for all the men who have done her wrong to one day have daughters who date guys just like they used to be. Karma is one hell of a b**tch, ain’t she?

“So I hope you have a daughter and I hope that she’s a fox
Daddy’s little girl – just as sweet as she is hot
She can’t help but love them boys
Who love to love and leave them girls just like her father
Yeah, karma’s a bitch – so I hope you have a daughter”

Hayes Carll- “She Left Me For Jesus.” If this song doesn’t make you giggle or at least grin, you should go to the doctor and have your sense of humor examined. And since we’re on the topic of funny Hayes Carll songs, check out Another Like You featuring Cary Ann Hearst. These songs aren’t new at all but I’m including them anyway, especially since they’ve brought me nothing but joy since discovering them. And since it’s Monday and the start of another work week for many of us, we could all use some laughs!

“She left me for Jesus and that just ain’t fair
She says that he’s perfect, how could I compare
She says I should find him and I’ll know peace at last
If I ever find Jesus, I’m kickin’ his ass”

Mo Pitney- “Everywhere.” That voice tho! This song comes from his 2016 album, Behind This Guitar. If you wanna hear some mo’ music (pun attempt) from this guy, check out his cover of Merle Haggard’s “Farmer’s Daughter.” No doubt The Hag would be proud of Mo!

Miranda Lambert- “To Learn Her.” Y’all really thought I was only gonna put one Miranda song on this list? lol yeah ok. I’m convinced that there are no bad songs on her The Weight of These Wings album. The more I listen to it the stronger I become in this conviction, and with songs like “To Learn Her,” it’s easy to see why.

“Oh, to love her is to learn her
Some things you just can’t learn”

Jason Isbell- “Cumberland Gap.” By now you guys should know that I’m gonna include Jason on pretty much every list I make (along with Miranda). I can’t get enough of this album (The Nashville Sound) or this man. If Jason is out there making music, you can pretty much expect that I’m gonna write about him.

“I ain’t cut out for war, unless I know what I’m fighting for
And there’s nothing here but churches, bars, and grocery stores
Ain’t much money in the old-time mandolin
So I cash my check and I drink ’til I’m on my ass again”

Talking Crap About the Radio (Again) 

I’m gonna take this opportunity to talk some crap about radio again. With the exception of Jon Pardi, Miranda Lambert (though not nearly enough), and sometimes Chris Stapleton, you’ll probably never hear any of these artists on the radio. There’s plenty of airtime for Kelsea Ballerini but none for Brandy Clark? Give me a break! And radios can play the same Jason Aldean song fifty times a day but can’t throw in a Cody Jinks song every once in awhile? Please. This is why I no longer listen to radio and wish I had stopped a long time ago. Mainstream country music needs a revival, however, I don’t see that happening anytime soon. At least that’s not keeping the guys and gals above from doing their thing! And as long as they’re around and putting out music, you can bet your bottom dollar that I’ll be listening!

Spotify 

Last week I created a Spotify account (beltwayboots) where all of the music that I write about can be found. Be sure to check it out!

Currently listening to: Tyler Childers- “Universal Sound.” Told  y’all this was some good stuff!

Friends I’ve Met through (Eric) Church

I hope everyone is having a great Sunday catching up with all of their Church friends! I’ve been catching up with some of my favorite people that I’ve met through Church and wanted to introduce y’all to some of these guys. These are all friends that I’ve met through Church, or rather, in Eric Church songs. If it hadn’t been for Church, me and these friends might’ve never met!

Without further ado, let’s get the introductions started!

My Friend Danny

On Mr. Misunderstood On the Rocks Live & (Mostly) Unplugged, Eric’s live album from his shows at Red Rocks Amphitheatre last summer, he includes a version of “Mistress Named Music,” which is the “Mistress Named Music-Red Rocks Medley.” In the middle of this song, he breaks out into Bob Seger, Loggins and Messina, Little Feat, Billy Joel, and George Strait, turning this song into an almost nine minute long medley with his musical idols weaved into the middle of it. One of the songs that he sings is “Danny’s Song” by Loggins and Messina off of their Sittin’ In album. Even though Eric only sings the chorus in this song, it was enough to make me wanna find the whole song. I instantly fell in love with this song and am so thankful that Danny (and his song) are now a part of my life.

It was also in this song that I met Lowell George, Bill Payne, Roy Estrada, and Richie Hayward aka the guys of Little Feat. Together me and these guys have gone from Tucson to Tucumcari, Tehachapi to Tonapah- the places mentioned in their song “Willin‘,” which Eric also sings in this medley.

My Voodoo Queen Friend Marie Laveau 

In “Devil, Devil (Prelude: Princess of Darkness)” Eric references Bobby Bare and it was through this song that he and I first met. And as Church connections usually go, Bobby Bare then introduced me to Marie Laveau. Now I’m not one to partake in Church gossip, but if I was, Marie Laveau would definitely be at the center of it. I mean, after all, she’s a voodoo queen who casts spells on men and makes them disappear. While she may be the topic of Church gossip, we could all use a friend who possesses the power to make people disappear, so I’m keeping her around!

My Red Headed Stranger Friend

It was at Church that I met a red headed stranger from Blue Rock, Montana. Over time, this stranger and I have become quite good friends and I’m happy to say that he’s no longer a stranger (nor a redhead as he’s mostly grey these days). The friend I’m talking about is none other than Willie Nelson. His album, “Red Headed Stranger” is one that Eric rediscovers during his “Record Year,” while also getting down with some James Brown. I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t know who was Willie Nelson was but learning about his discography, and specifically about the Red Headed Stranger album, was something that came from Church. If I could offer one piece of advice for getting to know my Red Headed Stranger friend, it would be “don’t cross him [and] don’t boss him!”

Eric also sings about New Grass Revival in “Record Year.” Apparently, I had found them years ago in the form of Garth Brooks’ “Callin’ Baton Rouge” and just didn’t know it. This is one of my favorite Garth songs (the live version, especially!) but I gotta give credit where credit is due because if it weren’t for NGR this song wouldn’t exist.

For more NGR, check out “In The Middle of the Night,” which I discovered on Eric’s Spotify playlist, “Round Here Buzz.”

My Misunderstood Friends

“Now, your buddies get their rocks off on Top 40 radio
But you love your daddy’s vinyl, old-time rock and roll
Elvis Costello, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and think Jeff Tweedy
Is one bad mother”

I wrote about Ray Wylie Hubbard in my post about finding the devil through Church. Ironically, he’s been one of my favorite people I’ve met through Church. Hubbard was mentioned in “Mr. Misunderstood” along with Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy. Of course I knew who Elvis Costello was before Eric name dropped him in “Mr. Misunderstood,” but despite knowing who he was, I never gave him much attention, that was until Eric convinced me to give him a fair chance. The first Elvis Costello song that I really came to like was “A Good Year for the Roses.” After looking this song up, it was easy to see why I liked this song so much- it was originally a country song, first sang by George Jones. From Church to Costello to The Possum, the connections I’ve made through Church have been endless!

While I’m still not sure if Jeff Tweedy is really one bad mother, I’ve been trying my hardest to get into Wilco, which has been Tweedy’s band since 1994. One Wilco song I’ve found that I really like is “Jesus, etc.” (fitting for Church, right?) It’s been said that Eric’s “Mr. Misunderstood” resembles a 1996 song from Wilco titled, “Misunderstood” in that it “matches a touch of melody and tempo” and shares themes found in this song. If Jeff Tweedy was the inspiration behind “Mr. Misunderstood,” then I guess he really is one bad mother.

I’m happy to have Tweedy join my group of misunderstood Church friends along with Costello and Hubbard. After all, Church is supposed to be about inclusion, right?

Are You Sure Eric Done It This Way? 

Eric’s Carolina album includes the song, “Lotta Boot Left to Fill,” in which he sings, “I don’t think Waylon done it this way, And if he was here he’d say Hoss neither did Hank.” This line is inspired by a Waylon Jennings song, “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way.” In these two songs, Waylon and Eric are each critical of the state of country music at the time of their writing and wonder about how their idols did things in their time. For Waylon, it was Hank Williams and for Eric it was Waylon Jennings that set the gold standard on how things should be done. I have no doubt that this song played a huge role in my love of Waylon Jennings that started years ago as it began around the same time that I saw Eric perform this song in concert back in 2011. Out of all of my Church friends, I’d have to say that Waylon and I are the closest. I mean, after all, ladies do love outlaws!

There’s already a song about about Eric’s music (Marc Leach’s “She Don’t Go To Church,” which I wrote about here) and I wouldn’t be surprised if years from now someone is singing, “Are You Sure Eric Done It This Way?”

That’s How I Got to Tom T. Hall, Bobby Bare, and Whitey Morgan

I mentioned in my post about Eric’s live performances that he often plays a song specific to the city that he’s in when he’s on tour so when Eric performed in Southaven, Mississippi, which is just minutes outside of Memphis, it only made sense that “That’s How I Got to Memphis” was on the setlist. Originally sung by Tom T. Hall, this song has been covered by Bobby Bare, Whitey Morgan, Roseanne Cash, The Avett Brothers, Buddy Miller, and many others. I’m not sure how these guys got there, but Eric Church is how I got to Memphis. He’s also how I made some friends named Tom T. Hall, Bobby Bare, and Whitey Morgan.

Meeting Friends through Church Recommendations 

It hasn’t just been through his music that Eric has turned me on to new artists but also through his recommendations. In an interview Eric did with Bobby Bones three years ago (that I watched on YouTube in London- before I even knew who Bobby Bones was), Bobby asked what artists Eric liked and he gave the names Amos Lee and Brandy Clark. Immediately after, I gave each of these artists a listen and became fans of both. To this day, Amos Lee’s “Chill In the Air” is still one of my all-time favorite songs. I also found Brandy Clark’s “Stripes” which led me to her first album, 12 Stories. A few months later, after I had returned from London, Brandy was the opening act at an Eric Church concert that I attended and I made sure to meet her and get her autograph that night. My only regret about doing this was that I practically missed all of Dwight Yoakam’s performance while I was waiting in line to meet her. Sorry, Dwight!

Amos and Brandy are two examples of friends that I didn’t necessarily meet through Church but rather because Church recommended them to me.

Church Friends Ain’t Just for Sunday Mornings 

I knew that going to Church was good for you but I never knew it could lead to so many great friendships! Just look at all the awesome people I’ve added to my friends circle because of Church!

Though these might be my Church friends, I prefer seeing them on Friday nights, not Sunday mornings, so this coming Friday (8/18), I’ll be going to see Ray Wylie Hubbard at Hill Country BBQ in Washington, DC. Come on out if you’re in the area!

Currently listening to: Dwight Yoakam- “A Thousand Miles From Nowhere.” Sorry for missing your performance that one time, Dwight!

New to Me: The Tracks I’m Playing (Week of August 7, 2017)

In the two months since I started writing this blog, I’ve learned so much about country music. The fact that I called myself a country music fan just a few short months ago is laughable. As the saying goes, “the more you know, the more you realize how much you don’t know” and that is exactly how I feel about country music. For example, I knew about some of the greatest country singers like Willie, Waylon, and Johnny but I never knew about John Prine or Gram Parsons. I’m now in love with John Prine and think he’s one of the greatest songwriters of all time- I just wish I’d known about him sooner.

There have been some other changes besides just the new music I’m discovering. For example, I no longer listen to the radio. Like practically never. I used to sometimes listen to Bobby Bones on my morning commute but after realizing how many great new artists are out there that he’s not playing, I figured why should I? I also never liked that he didn’t give Eric Church’s songs a lot of play. I’m not sure how much of this is actually Bobby or the higher-ups making the calls but either way, I’m no longer wasting my time listening to the same Jason Aldean and FGL songs continuously playing on a loop. And it’s not just Bobby Bones. You’d be hard pressed, especially in the Washington, DC area, to find a radio station that plays some of today’s best artists- I’m talking Sturgill Simpson, Brandy Clark, Jason Isbell, Margo Price, Cody Jinks, and many others. I used to at least hear Kacey Musgraves on the radio when “Merry Go ‘Round” first came out but now you never hear her. What happened? I am, however, thankful to the few stations that still play the old stuff (Thunder 104.5 in Fredericksburg, VA WHADDUP!) like Waylon and The Oak Ridge Boys so to those stations who are still spinning those old records, I just wanna say thank ya!

Not only am I learning more about country music and discovering new artists and songs in this genre, but in other genres too. I’ve added a bunch of new rock, oldies, hip-hop, etc. to my music collection over these past few months as well.

The fact that I’m constantly learning about new artists and finding new songs that I love means that I’m achieving one of the goals that I set out to accomplish when I started this blog. My love of country music has only grown stronger and I have developed a deeper appreciation for it. Since I typically write about new music in my “The Tracks I’m Playing” posts, I wanted to change it up this week and write about some of the old stuff that I’ve discovered since starting this blog, or rather, the songs that are “new to me.” Here they are!

New Artists 

John Prine- “In Spite of Ourselves.” John Prine knew that the world needed more songs about sniffing someone’s undies and so he gave us this gem. He also knew that people needed to know what Jesus was up to in his missing years so he gave us, “Jesus, The Missing Years.” He also wanted us all to blow up our TV and throw away our paper so he gave us, “Spanish Pipedream.” Finding these songs has truly bettered my life. Now I just need to go blow up my TV.

Gram Parsons- “Love Hurts.” So this song isn’t “new to me” at all but this version of it is. I’ve known the Nazareth cover of this song for years and was a fan after hearing it for the first time in high school. Not that these two versions are competing against each other or anything but any version of a song that contains the angelic voice of Emmylou Harris automatically wins out in my book.

New Songs

Merle Haggard- “Sidewalks of Chicago.” I could listen to Merle Haggard sing the phonebook. And I’d probably download that song and listen to it everyday. Merle’s voice has the power to make you feel the emotions behind the song that he is singing. What I love most about this song in particular is the way he goes back and forth between singing and talking. I also love the way he says certain words in this song like “wine” when he talks about how if he buys bread, he can’t afford the wine. By the end of this song, you actually feel sorry for this guy and the fact that he can’t afford both bread and wine.

Willie Nelson- “Shotgun Willie.” Why is Shotgun Willie sitting in his underwear? Why is Shotgun Willie biting on a bullet and pulling out all of his hair? I don’t know and I also really don’t care. This song is great just the way it is- no explanations are needed. Shotgun Willie- you keep doing you!

Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter- “Honky Tonk Angels.” My all-time favorite country music couple right here, ladies and gentlemen! Any song these two sing together is perfection so of course their version of “Honky Tonk Angels” is gonna be a good one. Even though the original singer of this song was Kitty Wells, Waylon and Jessi made it their own in this performance. Waylon also jokes that Jessi hurt his feelings in this song. Toughen up, Waylon!

Steve Earle- “Guitar Town.” I’m still waiting for a man to tell me that one of these days he’s gonna settle down and take me back with him to the Guitar Town. Just know that when that day comes, I’ll be ready!

Jerry Reed- “When You’re Hot, You’re Hot.” One of the greatest life lessons can be found in this song- “when you’re hot, you’re hot and when you’re not, you’re not.” Where would be today as a society if Jerry Reed hadn’t come along to teach us this valuable lesson? I don’t even wanna know!

See also: “Amos Moses.” This poor boy’s daddy used to use him as alligator bait! Bless his heart!

Emmylou Harris- “Queen of the Silver Dollar,” “Bluebird Wine,” “Hank and Lefty,” and Boulder to Birmingham.” If you can’t tell, I’m a big fan of the Pieces of the Sky album. And if I could be the queen of anything, it would be the Silver Dollar, as she sings about on this album. As I mentioned above, Emmylou Harris has the voice of an angel. No, really. That’s probably why Gram Parsons included her on his Grievous Angel album that he did with his band “The Fallen Angels.” The man liked to surround himself with angels and Emmylou Harris was no exception. No voice has yet to come along in country music that can rival hers.

The Oak Ridge Boys- “Y’all Come Back SaloonandLeaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight.” Me and The Oak Ridge Boys go way back, after all, these are the guys who taught another one of life’s most important lessons in country music- “trying to love two women is like a ball a chain.” I’m just gonna have to take their word on that! When they’re not teaching you about the struggles that come with loving multiple women, these guys are singing other great songs like the ones listed above. And of course, let’s not forget about “Elvira.Giddy up oom poppa omm poppa mow mow. 

I hope none of y’all are judging me for not knowing these songs and artists until recently. I’m a firm believer that everything happens for a reason and maybe I wasn’t meant to find these songs until now. Perhaps if I had known about them years ago they wouldn’t have meant as much to me. The important thing is that I know them now!

Currently listening to: John Prine – “Let’s Talk Dirty in Hawaiian.” A language I’m now really regretting never taking the time to learn! I’ve always said that you haven’t really mastered a language until you can talk dirty in it. Actually, this is the first time I’ve ever said that, but I’m gonna start saying it.

That Good Ole Liberal Country Music (Yep, you read that right!)

It’s hard being a liberal country music fan sometimes, especially when you’ve got artists like Toby Keith and Alabama performing for Donald Trump. Toby Keith even took things a step further by performing for Trump on his trip to Saudi Arabia in May. Was he finally going to put a boot in their ass for 9/11?? Nope. Instead he went to kiss some ass (who goes by the name of Donald Trump) by performing a free concert, which was for men only. This might’ve been the first time in Saudi history that women had the advantage over men by not having to sit through that. Though it has been said that Toby Keith is not a supporter of Donald Trump, actions speak louder than words, and his actions are saying otherwise. And Alabama, really!? The same band that sings, “Daddy was a veteran, a southern democrat, They oughta get a rich man to vote like that” in “Song of the South!” Where did these guys go?

Not only do you have country artists cozying up to Trump but the lyrics of some country songs are pretty dang awful. I practically had to pick my jaw up off the ground when I was listening to David Allan Coe’s “If That Ain’t Country” not too long ago and heard the n-word. I even Googled the lyrics just to be sure I didn’t mishear him. I didn’t. He actually said it. As I looked more into Coe’s music, I found that in the ’80s, he released an underground album with a song that has a title too offensive to post here because it contains, you guessed it, the n-word again. If you’re curious about this song, there’s a whole world wide web where you can look this up for yourself. It might just be the liberal snowflake (sarcasm) in me getting offended by things but I think these songs should offend most people, not just us beautiful snowflakes.

Thankfully, for liberal country music fans like myself, there are people like Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Kacey Musgraves, and Will Hoge out there who have restored my faith that there are other like-minded people in this genre.

Not Your Typical Country Song (And Thank Goodness!)

On Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit‘s new album, The Nashville Sound, there’s a song called “White Man’s World.” In addition to discussing race, looking at both African Americans and Native Americans in this country, this song also takes a swing at the patriarchy.

Isbell appeared on The Daily Show With Trevor Noah where he discussed this song along with the emotions that he was feeling the day after Trump won the election, especially in regards to his daughter. In this interview, Isbell said, “The thing that popped into my mind first was ‘Thank God she’s an infant, because I don’t have to explain any of this to her. She’ll figure it out as she grows up, but if she was a couple of years older I would have to be like, ‘OK, honey here’s what happened today and this is why your father doesn’t really know anything about human people in this country anymore.'”

In “White Man’s World,” Isbell brings up the emotions that he was feeling in regards to his daughter after the election by singing about how he once thought this world could be hers, but her momma knew better (her momma being Jason’s wife, singer/songwriter Amanda Shires Isbell). He also talks about looking into a black man’s eyes and “wishing [he’d] never been one of the guys who pretended not to hear another white man’s joke.” These are all topics you’re not likely to find in many country songs, making this song, and Jason’s outspokenness about politics, all that more important and necessary in these troubling times.

Love Trumps Hate


Not only are country songs dealing with the political issues of the day but so too are their music videos. In his video (see below) for “All Around You,” Sturgill Simpson shows a young boy draped in a cape with a superhero mask across his eyes who goes on to battle an enemy who has an uncanny resemblance to Donald Trump (take a look at minute 2:34, which is also pictured above.) He manages to defeat this Trumpian enemy with his heart-shaped shield, which he uses to make a hole in this guy’s wall (sound familiar?) for people to walk through. Hearts appear in other parts of the video from the ring on the young superhero’s finger to the shape of the stars that illuminate the sky after his defeat. This song comes from Sturgill’s Grammy Award winning album A Sailor’s Guide to Earth, which he wrote as a letter to his son and wife. I can only imagine that Sturgill sees his sons (he now has two) reflected in the little boy in this video. The fact that he’s probably teaching them to use love to combat the hateful things taking place in this world makes me love Sturgill even more than I already did (and that was a lot!)

 

This isn’t the first time (and I’m sure it won’t be the last) that Sturgill Simpson has gotten political in his music. Take the lyrics from his song “Call to Arms” for example.

“I done Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Iran
North Korea tell me where does it end
Well the bodies keep piling up with every day
How many more of em they gonna send

Well they send their sons and daughters off to die
For some oil
To control the heroin
Well son I hope you don’t grow up
Believing that you’ve got to be a puppet to be a man”

Country music needs more artists like Sturgill Simpson who aren’t afraid to get political in their songs and music videos!

[Side note: if you aren’t familiar with the genius that is Sturgill Simpson, please take some time to familiarize yourself. This man is one of the best things to happen to country music in a looong time!]

Love Whomever You Damn Well Please

I couldn’t write this post without including my girl Kacey Musgraves. In 2014, she won Song of the Year at the CMA Awards for her song, “Follow Your Arrow.” Despite this achievement, Kacey got some crap for this song. With lines like “Make lots of noise, kiss lots of boys, or kiss lots of girls if that’s something you’re into” and encouraging people to roll up a joint (or don’t), people’s panties definitely got in a bunch over this song. According to Fox News, some people saw the song as an “attack on Christians” (insert picture of me rolling my eyes here.) With Trump’s announcement last week that transgender people will no longer be allowed to serve in the military, more friends of the LGBTQ community need to speak up and speak out. Kacey not only did this with her music but she also tweeted her support of pride month back in June and even wrote a love letter to the LGBTQ community featured on Billboard.

To all the members of the LGBTQ community- keep following your arrow!

That Damn Confederate Flag

Country music is synonymous with the south, which unfortunately often brings to mind images of Confederate flags. Thankfully, there are country artists speaking out against this ugly flag in their music. When it comes to the stars and bars, Will Hoge ain’t having it. In his song, “Still a Southern Man,” he makes it clear that you can be a southerner and not support the Confederate flag. However, he hasn’t always felt this way. Growing up in South Carolina, Hoge “used to proudly wave the Confederate flat at high school football games.” After all, his school’s mascot was the rebel soldier. It wasn’t until he graduated and began traveling and meeting people from different walks of life that he finally saw the flag for what it really is: a symbol of “slavery, oppression and secession.” He discusses this realization in his song where he calls the flag “a hammer driving nails in the coffin of a long dead land.”

“There’s a flag flying overhead
And I used to think it meant one thing
But now I’ve grown up and seen the world
And I know what it really means
I wanted it to be the symbol of a boy
Who wasn’t scared to take a stand
But now I know it’s just a hammer driving nails
In the coffin of a long dead land”

The artists that have been mentioned in this post are all newer artists, but as Steve Earle shows, the older guys are also getting in on this. Earle sang about his disdain for the Confederate flag in his 2015 song, “Mississippi It’s Time.” In this song, he tries to reason with Mississippi that it’s time for the flag to come down. As the song states, “we can’t move ahead if we’re lookin’ behind.” Another major kudos goes to the “Copperhead Road” singer for giving all of the proceeds from this song to the Civil Rights organization Southern Poverty Law Center.

Look away, Mississippi
Mississippi, you’re on my mind
All the crosses burned and the lessons unlearned
Left a scar across my heart and it’s ten miles wide
Sick of sloggin’ through the history of this wounded land of mine
Still payin’ the cost cause the war was lost
Mississippi, don’t you reckon it’s time

I wish I was in a land that never held a soul in bondage ever
Wouldn’t have to drag these chains behind 
Mississippi, it’s time

Us liberals know the true meaning of this flag (it’s slavery- anyone who says differently needs to quit kidding themselves) and appreciate artists like Will Hoge and Steve Earle for speaking up about this.

Final Thoughts

Although Johnny Cash never lived to see a Trump presidency (or evan a candidacy- that lucky son of a gun!), I’d like to think that if he were alive today, that he would be opposed to this administration. Because if not, what was wearing all that black really for?

Sinners Like Me Go To Church on Sundays

I finally got myself back to Church on a Sunday! I’m sorry for the not-so-great church attendance these past few Sundays- I’ll be sure to drop an extra $20 in the offering plate today to make up for it!

This month, two of Eric’s albums celebrated anniversaries. Eric’s freshman album Sinners Like Me celebrated its eleventh anniversary and Chief, his third album, celebrated its sixth anniversary. This Sunday, especially since I’m feeling like quite the sinner with my poor Church attendance, I’m gonna focus on the album that started it all, Sinners Like Me. 

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A Good First Impression 

They say you only get one chance to make a first impression and boy did Eric make an unforgettable one with Sinners Like Me. With his first album, Eric made sure to include songs that show his range as an artist- from concert favorites like “Pledge Allegiance to the Hag” and “These Boots” to serious songs like “The Hard Way;” from great storytelling songs like “Lightning” to songs that make you grin like “Two Pink Lines.” This is also the album that contains my all-time favorite Church hymn- “Can’t Take It With You” (which I discuss in detail here.) As you make your way through the twelve tracks on this album you really get a sense of who Eric is not only as a songwriter and an artist, but as a person. For many of us, this album was the reason we started going to Church.

The singles that came from this album were “How ‘Bout You,” “Two Pink Lines,” “Guys Like Me,” and “Sinners Like Me,” the title track. The first single, “How ‘Bout You” was the first Eric Church song I remember hearing on the radio. In this song, Eric let us know right off the bat exactly who he was. In regards to his style, he sang, “I don’t need baggy clothes, or rings in my nose to be cool” and when it came to his blue collar work ethic he let us know that he “ain’t got no blue-blood trust fund [he] can dip into.” He was confident in knowing who he was and made sure everyone else knew it too. He also made you think about the kind of person that you are by repeatedly asking, “how ’bout you?” Well, Eric, my nose ain’t pierced and I don’t have a trust fund either so I guess that makes us both a part of the chosen few! I’m sure I’m not alone in saying that this song was my first introduction to Eric Church and for that reason it holds a special place in my heart.

I know where I come from
How ’bout you?
I don’t need baggy clothes,
Or rings in my nose to be cool.
The scars on my knuckles,
Match these scuffs on these cowboy boots.
An’ there’s a whole lot more like me
How ’bout you?

It wouldn’t be Church if we didn’t talk about sinning now would it? In the album’s title track, “Sinners Like Me,” Eric sings about coming from a long of sinners just like himself. However, being a sinner isn’t just a trait that runs in the Church family because, as he sings in this song, when he dies he’ll find himself standing in a long line of sinners just like him. Thank goodness there’s Church for all those sinners to go to on Sundays!

The pinnacle song on this album is “Lightning,” the album’s only song written solely by Eric. This song is so important because it was this song that earned Eric his publishing deal, which should come as no surprise as you listen to its lyrics. “Lightning” is everything that a storytelling country song should be and it serves as a testament to Eric’s talent as a songwriter. It takes someone truly talented to put into song the final thoughts of a man awaiting his death while sitting in an electric chair. Eric manages to do just that in about five minutes time. In fact, Eric manages to capture this death row inmate’s life in song form so well that it was featured on Rolling Stone’s list of 17 Country Songs That Would Make Great Movies. RS lists Bryan Cranston as the suggested actor who should play the death row inmate in that movie. Now that’s a movie that I would definitely pay to see! Until that movie gets made, I’ll just keep watching the music video (check out Eric with his long hair!!)

Other songs featured on this album include “What I Almost Was,” “Livin’ Part of Life,” and “Before She Does.” Eric still plays some of these songs from time to time at his concerts, showing that the impression this album left on his fans is one long enough to last eleven years (and I’m sure many more to come!)

I Pledge Allegiance to “The Hag”

The most impressive thing about this album, in my opinion, is that Merle Haggard sings on the song that was written about him- “Pledge Allegiance To The Hag.” The fact that the greatest country artist of all time (this is a fact, not an opinion) sang on Eric Church’s very first album says a great deal about what The Hag must’ve thought about Eric and his music. If there’s one artist that deserves a song about having allegiance pledged to them, it’s Merle. And if any artist should get the honor of singing that song, it’s Eric Church!

Sins and Blasphemy 

I’ve heard that an artist’s first album is usually their best because they have their whole life to write it, whereas the albums that come after that are usually written in a much shorter time frame, meaning they’re often not as good. Although Sinners Like Me is a great album, I don’t think that’s true for Eric. Each of his five albums (so far) are so different from one another and they are all great in their own individual way. His albums aren’t just a collection of singles, they’re albums, meant to be listened to as such. To say that one of his albums is better than another would be blasphemy, something we definitely don’t wanna do at Church!

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I’m still playing Sinners Like Me eleven years after it was released and I’m sure I’ll still be playing it for years to come. It’s probably because I like my country rockin’. How ’bout you?

Happy Anniversary Sinners Like Me and Chief! 

Currently listening to: Merle Haggard (a.k.a. The Hag)- “I Think I’ll Just Stay Here and Drink.” Gotta pledge my allegiance to the Hag, as Eric would say!