The Perfect Storm Playlist

Hurricanes, Floods, and Storms, Oh My!

While I’ve been too busy to write a real post these past few weeks, I haven’t been too busy to put together a bangin’ playlist for Hurricane Florence. If you’re looking for the perfect playlist for riding out the storm, then look no further! You’ll notice that not all of the songs relate to hurricanes so feel free to refer to this playlist for other inclement weather related events as well.

Stormy Weather

Brad Paisley– “Perfect Storm” – this song is about a girl and not about an actual storm but since lots of storms are named after ladies, you can make of this what you will
Amanda Shires– “My Love (The Storm)” – with lyrics like those below, it’s almost as though this song was written for a September hurricane

“I am the storm at summer’s end
Watch the willows mourn
Watch the branches bend”

Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter– “Storms Never Last” – a hopeful reminder that storms, whether they’re weather, or a stormy patch in a relationship, will soon pass. #relationshipgoals
John Prine and Lee Ann Womack also did a cover of this song, which you can find here.
Brandi Carlile-  “The Eye” – as Brandi sings, “you can dance in a hurricane but only if you’re standing in the eye.” Though I would recommend evacuating if you’re near a real hurricane. Maybe don’t stick around and dance?
Sturgill Simpson- The Storm” – songs about storms and love go together like thunder and lightning!

“There’s a lull and the wind is dying down
Don’t let it fool you the storm ain’t done
Flood waters rolling in and my heart’s gonna drown
Our love wilted like a flower that ain’t got enough sun”

“Here I am, rock you like a hurricane!” – Florence

It only makes sense that the Scorpions‘ song “Rock You Like A Hurricane” tops this section. The Band of Heathens’ song “Hurricane” is also a great song for this time of year. While specific to New Orleans, I think it can apply to places like Charleston as well.
This is also a chance for me to highlight two of my favorite Bob Dylan songs: “A Hard Rains A-Gonna Fall” (an obvious choice) and “Hurricane” (and even more obvious choice though it has nothing to do with an actual hurricane). Would also including “Blowin’ In the Wind” here be too much of a stretch??

“Thunderbolt and Lighting, Very, Very Frightening Me”

Cody Jinks wrote the perfect song for a torrential downpour with “Loud and Heavy.” Crank this song up if you want to drown out the actual loud thunder and heavy rain happening outside.
The Steel Woods– “Let the Rain Come Down” – let the rain come down? Oh it will!
Zac Brown Band and Dave Grohl– “Let It Rain” – once again, it will!
Garth Brooks- The Thunder Rolls” – the thunder may roll and the lightning may strike but hopefully no loves are growing cold on sleepless nights like they are in this song (friendly reminder: the wife shoots her cheating husband in this song!)
Live– “Lightning Crashes” – while it may be about reincarnation, I’m still including it
Stevie Ray Vaughn– “Texas Flood” – this song might have been more relevant to Hurricane Harvey last year but as I said, this playlist is not specific to any one storm
Clint Black– “Like the Rain” – if you like the rain, then you’ll like this song about liking the rain
Guns N’ Roses– “November Rain” – there’s no song about September rain, so this one will just have to do
Gary Allan– “Songs About Rain” and “Every Storm (Runs Out of Rain)” – Gary Allan gets it! As you’ll see in the former song, there is no shortage of songs about rain in country music. Here he references “Kentucky Rain,” “Rainy Night in Georgia,” and “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.” If he ever wants to do a sequel to this song, I think this playlist would be a great place for him to pull from. In the latter, the theme of storms of eventually ending returns. This song is a reminder that all bad parts of life will soon pass much like all storms will run out of rain.
Eddie Rabbit– “I Love A Rainy Night” – if you’re in the storm’s path right now you must likely will be getting some rainy nights. If you love them as much as Eddie Rabbit does, you’re in for a treat!
James Taylor– “Fire and Rain” – while you may be seeing rain, I hope nobody is seeing fire!
Vance Joy– “Fire and the Flood” – once again, there may be flooding, but “God willing and the creek don’t rise” there aren’t any fires! Though I don’t know if a fire would really stand a chance in this weather.

Turnpike Troubadours– “A Tornado Warning” – while not about hurricanes and not really relevant to Miss Florence, this Turnpike Troubadours’ song offers another glimpse of hope by reminding us that storms, in this case a tornado, won’t last long.

“Yeah in the broken morning light
That simple shade of blue
The kind that always follow you”

In case you lose your power, you’re gonna want to have these songs downloaded! The link to the Spotify playlist for these songs (without Garth Brooks, of course) can be found here.

I hope this post didn’t come across as insensitive and trying to make light of the current situation with Hurricane Florence. Hurricanes are a serious matter and even though, as these songs remind us, they eventually end, the damage they leave behind can last for much longer. Everyone in the storm’s path, please stay safe!!

Currently listening to: songs about rain!

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Deep in the Musical Heart of Texas

Don’t Mess With Texas and Its Music

“You got Bellaire class and Dallas style, Austin soul and a Luckenbach smile”
-Slaid Cleaves- “Texas Love Song”

“Greetings from Austin” Mural

If you’re a fan of country music, especially old school country, then you know that Texas is a big deal. With artists like George Strait dominating the airwaves from the 1980s through the 2010s, songs about Texas were commonly heard on the radio. And thanks to “All My Ex’s Live in Texas,” most country music fans from the past few decades can probably rattle off the names of a handful of Texas cities with ease. I’m pretty sure King George can also be credited with putting “Amarillo” on the map! Texas is also home to numerous country (and non-country) musicians including some of the most influential in the genre like Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. Texas itself is a musical state, it’s capital, Austin, is the “Live Music Capital of the World” and it’s home to bars and honky tonks made famous because of their musical connection, like Billy Bob’s in Fort Worth. It can be credited with birthing the Outlaw Country movement of the 1970’s and today, with the help of Oklahoma, it’s given us “Red Dirt” music. It’s the location of movies like Urban Cowboy and it’s the host of Austin City Limits. It’s because of its rich country music history that I chose Texas as my summer vacation destination. Texas also has a lot to offer outside of music- you can find rodeos, cattle drives, and BBQ there. You can float the river in New Braunfels and you can pick up a kolach from the Czech bakery in West. It’s where you go to get back to the basics of love.

Country music was definitely a central theme of my trip. Prior to heading out to the Lone Star State, I made a Spotify playlist titled, “Texas Love Songs,” the title of which can be credited to Slaid Cleaves‘ song “Texas Love Song.” As the trip planning got underway and even while I was in Texas, I was continually adding songs to this list. Even now after I’m home I’m still adding to this extensive list. On it you’ll find songs about Texas, songs that reference Texas, and songs by Texans. Even stuff that doesn’t fit this criteria has made its way onto this playlist such as songs by the Turnpike Troubadours who I thought were worth including because of their “Red Dirt” classification. While the Texas connection of some songs on this playlist may be obvious, like “Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind?” others may be less so like “One Night Taco Stand,” which made me think of Austin and the numerous food trucks and taco joints in the city. And while you’re not likely to ever find me including a Blake Shelton song on a playlist, this may be the one exception, as this playlist wouldn’t be complete without “Austin.” I’ve compiled all of the top Texas songs in a Spotify playlist that you can find here.

This playlist came to life on several occasions throughout this trip. While in Dallas I played two of my favorite songs about The Big D as I walked around- Mark Chesnutt‘s “Goin’ Through the Big D” and George Strait’s “Run.” And while in Luckenbach, Texas, singing this song together with other visitors, I wasn’t feeling no pain.

The Prophets of Country Music

If the biblical holy land produced prophets known for the messages that they delivered to the masses then the same can be said of Texas producing country music prophets. Whether you credit it to divine intervention or something in the water, there’s bound to be a reason why so many musical greats hail from this state (the sheer size of it doesn’t hurt in this regard). I’m talking about people like Willie Nelson, Townes Van Zandt, Waylon Jennings, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Kris Kristofferson, Billy Joe Shaver, Robert Earl Keen, Lee Ann Womack, George Strait, Rodney Crowell, Guy Clark, Steve Earle, Lyle Lovett, Rhett Miller, and Stevie Ray Vaughn. There are modern day prophets coming out of this state as well like Cody Jinks, Kacey Musgraves, Josh Abbott, Amanda Shires, Shane Smith, Miranda Lambert, Hayes Carll, Flatland Calvary, Shakey Graves, Ryan Bingham, and Sunny Sweeney. And it’s not just country artists that are coming out of Texas as it’s also the home of musicians like Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, and Don Henley as well. That’s a whole lot of messengers all coming from one place! As Little Texas sings, “God Blessed Texas.”

Stevie Ray Vaughn State in Austin, Texas

A Country Music Pilgrimage

“Now I love the USA
And the other states
Ahh, they’re OK
Texas is the place I wanna be
And I don’t care if I ever go to Delaware anyway
‘Cause we got Stubbs, and Gruene Hall and Antone’s, and John T’s
Country Store
We’ve got Willie and Jacky Jack, Robert Earl, Pat, Cory, Charlie and me
And so many more”
-Ray Wylie Hubbard- “Screw You, We’re From Texas”

While you may not think “holy land” when you think of Texas, the amount of pilgrimage stops available to a country fan there may make you change your mind. There were several places that I put on my itinerary for this trip because of their significance in country music. Those places were John T. Floore Country Store, Gruene Hall, Antone’s, and Stubb’s. If you’re familiar with Ray Wylie Hubbard‘s song “Screw You, We’re From Texas,” then you know that he references all of these places. John T. Floore Country Store is the musical birthplace of Willie Nelson and John T. Floore (the man) is name dropped in Willie Nelson’s song “Shotgun Willie.”

Sign in front of John T. Floore Country Store in Helotes, Texas

While I didn’t stay for the performance at Stubb’s while I was there (I just ate some tasty food), I did catch a performance at Antone’s. There I had the pleasure of watching a performance by Barbara Lynn, a woman I didn’t know until that night but she’s actually a big deal having written songs recorded by both Freddy Fender and The Rolling Stones. At Gruene Hall, I listened to Bo Porter play a few songs including one about the great state of Texas called “She Likes Livin’ in Texas.”

Clockwise from the top left: Stubb’s BBQ (Austin), Gruene Hall (New Braunfels), John T. Floore Country Store (Helotes), Antone’s Nightclub (Austin)

“Let’s go to Luckenbach, Texas
With Waylon and Willie and the boys
This successful life we’re livin’
Got us feuding like the Hatfields and McCoys”
-Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings- “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)”

While it was nice to check these places off my Texas bucket list, the most meaningful experience I had in Texas was in Luckenbach. As the song says, “out in Luckenbach, Texas ain’t nobody feeling no pain,” and that was definitely the case for me and everyone in the the post office/general store/bar that afternoon. With all of the singing, drinking, and joking that was taking place it was easy to forget about the real world for a couple of hours. The man performing that afternoon was Jimmy Lee Jones, a songwriter in his own right, who played some of his own songs for us and also took requests. One of his songs that he played was called “Quit Your Bitchin’,” which he got everyone to sing along to.  Jimmy Lee Jones has a reputation of his own in the music community, he was honored by the Texas Heritage Music Foundation, he’s opened for Willie’s picnics and shows on numerous occasions, and Willie Nelson has even said that “Jimmy Lee Jones is one of the best kept secrets in Texas.” Well, the secret is out now!

The artists that I requested Jimmy Lee Jones play that afternoon were Townes Van Zandt (he played “Poncho and Lefty“), Billy Joe Shaver (he played “The Devil Made Me Do It the First Time“), Roger Miller (he played “King of the Road“), and Robert Earl Keen (he played “Feeling Good Again” –  a song about the Mr. Blues bar in Bandera, TX which I had walked past earlier that same day not knowing its connection to the song!) He was accompanied on all of these songs by Dino, who played both banjo and dobro and at times the bartender Ricky even jumped in on harmonica. Together, Jimmy  Lee Jones and Dino make up his band, “Jimmy Lee Jones and A Creep at the Steel.” Some other songs that he played that afternoon included “Highwayman,” “Silver Wings,” and of course, “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love).” When I asked him if he ever covered songs by female artists and he then played a song by The Judds titled “Flies On The Butter (You Can’t Go Home Again).” Turns out he does. And would you believe me if I told you that he also played the theme song to Spongebob Squarepants?! Well, he did! This man kept all of us in stitches with his jokes including the one about how he got his football injury (the punch line: he fell off a cheerleader!) An added touch to that lovely afternoon in the back of the Luckenbach Post Office were the roosters walking around the store and bar.

Me in Luckenbach, Texas…feeling no pain. This picture was taken by Dino from “Jimmy Lee Jones and A Creep at the Steel.” (July 2018)

Here’s a video of Jimmy Lee, Dino, and a rooster singing “Whiskey River.”

Of course, my trip to the Texas did not cover all of the holy cities. Texas is a big state and I didn’t have time to cover it all. While I did see Austin, San Antonio, Fort Worth, Dallas, and some smaller towns like Fredericksburg and Bandera (The Cowboy Capital of the World), I was unable to see places like Lubbock (home of the West Texas Walk of Fame), Amarillo, Houston, La Grange (as in the ZZ Top Song), El Paso, Laredo, Galveston, Corpus Christi, and many others.

Holy Communion

“I wish I was in Austin 
In a chilly parlor bar 
Drinkin’ Mad Dog Margaritas 
And not carin’ where you are”
-Guy Clark- “Dublin Blues”

On my first day in Austin, I made my way out to the Texas Chili Parlor bar to have a holy communion of sorts. No, I didn’t have a wafer and wine, I had a Mad Dog Margarita, a place and a drink referenced by Guy Clark in his song “Dublin Blues.” This place is the definition of a “dive bar.” And while the Mad Dog Margarita wasn’t really my style (I’m not really a margarita girl anyway), I still enjoyed the experience of living out the dream Guy Clark once had while in Dublin.

A Mad Dog Margarita at the Texas Chili Parlor

Getting the Jinks Out

“I’ve been standing on the outside for all of my life
But I like the view, I’m not gonna lie”
-Cody Jinks- “Hippies and Cowboys”

One of the things I was most looking forward to on my trip was finally getting the chance to see Cody Jinks in concert. Of all the amazing artists I’ve discovered in the past year or so, this man ranks pretty high up there. I also may have planned my trip around getting to see him in concert (I did). The concert was held at Whitewater Amphitheater in New Braunfels, which is a short drive from Austin. The openers were Ward Davis and Colter Wall. I saw Colter Wall in DC back in April at a sold out show at U Street Music Hall and was surprised that the crowd didn’t really seem to be that into him in Texas. Obviously Cody was the main attraction but I consider Colter Wall to be pretty big in the country music world right now too and thought he would have gotten more love. Maybe it was just the area where I was standing and perhaps there were some die hard Colter fans out there that night in New Braunfels after all.

At this show, I managed to work my way all the way down to the front right behind the fence. While I wasn’t front and center, I was still front, which was pretty dang cool. The best part of the night was Cody playing my favorite song of his, “Somewhere in the Middle.” A song that serves as a reminder that if you happen to find yourself in the middle- be it the middle of life, in the middle of a tough situation, or heck, even in the middle of Texas- that’s just fine! He also played his new songs “Must Be the Whiskey,” which kicked off his set, “Lifers,” and “Somewhere Between I Love You and I’m Leavin’,” which are all featured on his upcoming album Lifers, which comes out July 27th. And of course he played his classics like “I’m Not the Devil,” “David,” and “Hippies and Cowboys,” which he ended the night with.

Cody Jinks at Whitewater Amphitheater, New Braunfels, TX (July 2018)

While Cody put on a great show, some of the audience members were annoying. While I won’t go off on a tangent about that here, I do just want to ask- what is with the whistling?! My ears aren’t pierced but after that concert they might be! Geezus!

Me, at a Cody Jinks concert, wearing a Cody Jinks t-shirt, drinking Lone Star beer with a Cody Jinks koozie (July 2018)

Having A Willie Good Time

I’ll wrap this post up by saying how much I loved all of the Willie Nelson tributes found throughout Austin. From his statue downtown to the “Willie for President” mural off South Congress Avenue, this city willie loves this Red Headed Stranger. It’s almost as though he’s the patron saint of Austin. He is surely the patron saint of Outlaw Country. One mural that was really cool was outside of a dentist’s office in Austin and featured Willie, Janis Joplin, and Stevie Ray Vaughn all taking care of their teeth in the bathroom mirror. Pictures of these murals can be found below.

I also made this trip a little more Willie-centric by visiting places like Luckenbach and John T. Floore Country Store. And while John T. Floore’s may be his “musical birthplace,” I made a short detour to Abbott, Texas on my drive from Austin to Fort Worth to see his actual birthplace. There wasn’t really that much to see there but it was just a quick stop off of I-35 so I figured I might as well check it out. There doesn’t seem like much to do in Abbott but if this place gave us Willie Nelson then it’s good in my book!

A water tower in Abbott, Texas- the birthplace of Willie Nelson

Lydian Dental in Austin, Texas

“If I could I’d vote for Willie to run our government
“Good mornin’ America, how are you?” He’d say with his pigtails and a grin
He would unite the whole nation with his guitar and his song
It’s the only thing that makes perfect sense
Willie Nelson for President”
-Peter Dawson- “Willie Nelson for President”

#Nelson2020

If you read my last blog post then you already know that I’m not opposed to a Willie Nelson presidency.

Willie Nelson Statue in Austin, Texas (July 2018)

Some other cool things that happened on my trip were two-stepping at the Broken Spoke, eating a waffle shaped like Texas, and watching the Cattle Drive in Forth Worth. After all of this, I feel like a real Texan. And as a real Texan I can say, “Screw you, we’re from Texas!” and mean it! So, screw you!

Before the cows came home in Fort Worth, Texas (July 2018)

Currently listening to: Eric Church– “Desperate Man.” While Eric is not a Texan and this song is not about Texas, there is a Texas connection found in this song- it was co-written with Ray Wylie Hubbard! Ray Wylie is also found in the music video for this song, which just came out today on Amazon. Eric also released this song and announced his upcoming album of the same name while I was in Austin so this song will forever remind me of my Texas trip. I also want to take this moment to say that I will be seeing Ray Wylie Hubbard in concert on Saturday at City Winery DC and I’ll be crossing my fingers in hopes that he plays “Screw You, We’re From Texas.”

Putting the ‘American’ in Americana

Happy Independence Day to my fellow Americans!
And to all non-Americans, happy Wednesday! 

If you were with me last year, you’ll remember that for this holiday I did a post on Celebrating America’s Diversity in Country Music. However, this year, I’m approaching this holiday from a different angle. That angle is a political one and for the occasion I’ve put together a list of songs that tackle some of the important issues facing our country. These songs touch on many things currently taking place in America- police killings of black men, the pay gap, guns, and more. And of course almost all of these songs fall into the Americana category- a genre that isn’t afraid to get political with artists who aren’t afraid to speak out. These men and women put the ‘American’ in Americana!

The Pay Gap

Margo Price– “Pay Gap

How do I love Margo Price? Let me count the ways! One of those ways would be her courage to sing about not-so-sexy topics like the pay gap. Aside from the pay gap, women in Nashville have a hard enough time making it as it is. And with the city’s “shut up and sing” mentality towards female artists, I imagine outspoken women like Margo have an even harder time. With this song she shows that she’ll speak out about what she thinks is important and just because she’s stopped to sing doesn’t mean she’s leaving her opinions behind- she’ll put them into a song. I respect Margo for sticking to her guns (not literal guns though) and singing about what she feels is important.

“We are all the same in the eyes of God
But in the eyes of rich white men
No more than a maid to be owned like a dog
A second-class citizen”

Race Relations and Police Brutality 

Rhiannon Giddens– “Better Get It Right The First Time

Rhiannon Giddens’ voice is so powerful and moving that you almost forget she’s signing about police killing unarmed black men. It’s a topic that needs to be spoken (and sung) about and I admire Rhiannon for having the courage to do it. While this song came out in 2017 it’s still relevant a year later. Unless we see some real changes, I’m afraid this song will still be relevant for many years to come.

“(Young man was a good man)
Did you stand your ground?
(Young man was a good man)
Is that why they took you down?
(Young man was a good man)
Or did you run that day?
(Young man was a good man)
Baby, they shot you anyway”

Priscilla Renea– “Land of the Free

On her recently released album Coloured, whose style she calls “country soul,” Priscilla Renea sings about race relations and police brutality in her song “Land of the Free.” The song concludes with Jimi Hendrix playing the “Star Spangled Banner” and couldn’t be more appropriate for the holiday today. I’m proud to include yet another black female artist on this list (Rhiannon Giddens being the first) and hope that over time we will begin to see more diversity in both Americana and country music. Read more about Priscilla in this NPR interview, “Priscilla Renea Refuses To Be Quiet About Racism In Country Music.” Shout out to my friend who sent this to me!

“There’s enough to go around for everyone to share
But a check from Uncle Sam? What would that repair?
All the broken families, fathers in a cell
Slavery’s abolished, but it’s still alive and well”

Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit– “White Man’s World

I know I talk about this song a lot but some things are worth repeating for redundancy’s sake. While this song deals heavily with race, mentioning both Native Americans and blacks, Jason also brings up sex, looking at the struggles his baby girl and wife face simply because they’re females. In spite of it all, Jason still has faith- “maybe it’s the fire in [his] little girl’s eyes.” While I’ve included this song here in this section, I could have also included it in the section below on the 2016 Election since it was written in response to it.

“I’m a white man looking in a black man’s eyes
Wishing I’d never been one of the guys
Who pretended not to hear another white man’s joke
Oh, the times ain’t forgotten”

Shakey Graves– “My Neighbor

Not sure if Shakey (if I may) wrote this song in an attempt to address race relations or not, but the image of a man in a turban living next to a polyester suit wearing (presumably white) man made me think about how none of us really know our neighbors. Not just our figurative neighbor but our literal neighbor, like the person you park your car beside and whose mail sometimes accidentally finds its way into your box. That guy.

“Oh my neighbor, my neighbor
At best we share a fence
We smile at each other
And we make up all the rest
I see you
Six-foot-two
In the polyester suit
Safe behind a cabin now
Wonderin’ if I’m around
‘Cause who am I?
Just some guy
With a turban and a knife
Only here to take away
Only reason you’re afraid
There’s no face
There’s no man behind the name
I’ve started to believe
My neighbor, we’re the same”

Drive-By Truckers– “Surrender Under Protest”

Featured on their 2016 album American Band, this song is “directly inspired by civil rights activists’ successful campaign to remove the Confederate flag from the South Carolina Statehouse after white supremacist Dylann Roof allegedly murdered nine African Americans at a Charleston church meeting, [it] casts an unsparing eye on those unable to abandon tradition even when the sin at its root has been fully exposed.”

“Does the color really matter?
On the face you blame for failure
On the shamin’ for a battle’s losing cause”

Gun Control 

Particle Kid– “Gunshow Loophole Blues

According to The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, “The Gun Control Act of 1968 requires anyone engaged in the business of selling guns to have a Federal Firearms License (FFL) and keep a record of their sales. However, this law does not cover all gun sellers. If a supplier is selling from his or her private collection and the principal objective is not to make a profit, the seller is not “engaged in the business” and is not required to have a license. Because they are unlicensed, these sellers are not required to keep records of sales and are not required to perform background checks on potential buyers, even those prohibited from purchasing guns by the Gun Control Act. The gun show loophole refers to the fact that prohibited purchasers can avoid required background checks by seeking out these unlicensed sellers at gun shows.” Yep, that gives me the blues too!

Brandi Carlile– “Hold Out Your Hand”

While you wouldn’t necessarily think “gun control” while listening to this song you will once you watch the video which features the March for Our Lives protest in Seattle. If there’s one thing Brandi Carlile is an expert at it’s knowing how to get me misty-eyed. This happened at her concert in May and also while watching this music video. #enoughisenough

“Well he came to my door to sell me the fear with some cameras and bullets and tension and here is a license for killing your own native son for a careless mistake and a fake plastic gun?

Deliver your brother from violence and greed for the mountains lay down for your faith like a seed. A morning is coming of silver and light there will be color and language and nobody wanting to fight. What a glorious sight”

Dispatch– “Dear Congress: Your Thoughts and Prayers Are Not Enough”

This song from Dispatch is in support of Common Sense Gun Reform. While I could post a powerful lyric from the song below for you, I’d rather you watch the video and read the Tweets that are posted and take in the images on the screen for yourself. I think that would say more than I ever could.

Will Hoge- Thoughts and Prayers

Following this trend is Will Hoge’s “Thoughts and Prayers,” which is also directed at Congress, or as he sings in this song, the people in “that big white dome” a.k.a. the whores to the NRA (his words, not mine. Though I don’t disagree.) You may remember Will from my liberal country music post from last year where I wrote about his song “Still a Southern Man.” Will has a history of writing songs about the not-so-pretty parts of America, from the confederate flag to gun violence.

“There’s a momma cryin’ ’cause the baby won’t come home
You tell a father that you’re sorry that his son is gone
While you sit and do nothin’ in that big white dome
And just hope we all forget to care”

War (What Is It Good For?) 

Mary Gauthier– “Brothers” (see also: the entire Rifles and Rosary Beads album)

Mary’s album Rifles and Rosary Beads was co-written with American veterans and their families, through the nonprofit SongwritingWith:Soldiers, and details the struggles that military men and women face not only overseas but at home too. This song in particular tells the story of a female soldier struggling to be considered an equal among her “brothers.” It’s fitting that we’re talking about this song on July 4th as one of the lines from the song reads, “I thought RPGs were fireworks, that’s how green I was at first.” You can read more about this project from Mary Gauthier’s NPR interview here. ALSO, I just want to add that I was at the gym this morning and saw Mary on CBS talking about this album! Glad others are getting to hear about her work on this holiday.

If anything, this album should serve as a wake-up call to the horrors of war. And not only the stuff that happens on the battlefield but after the war too. This country doesn’t do enough for its veterans and despite your views on war we should still take care of our military men and women. You can donate to the Wounded Warrior Project here.

“You broke my heart on veterans day
Don’t you understand the words you say
You raised a flag for the men you serve
What about the women, what do we deserve?”

Bob Wayne– “80 Miles from Baghdad

This song is from Bob’s album Bob Hombre (think of that title what you will.) He co-wrote this song with a veteran soldier who was stationed in Iraq, which makes its depiction of war all that more real. You can watch a video on the song-writing process behind this song here.

“80 miles from Baghdad, I killed my first man
3000 miles from nowhere, away from my homeland
I didn’t go there seeking weapons or some foreign policy”

Sturgill Simpson– “Call to Arms

I’ve already written about this song in my post “Sturgill Simpson: A Metamodern Country Philosopher,” if you want to read what I had to say about it there.

“Well they send their sons and daughters off to die
For some oil
To control the heroin
Well son I hope you don’t grow up
Believing that you’ve got to be a puppet to be a man”

John Prine– “Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore

An oldie but a goodie! As John said at this concert just last month, he wrote this song in 1968 as a political song and it’s still a political song today. And he’s gonna keep playing it until they get it right!

“But your flag decal won’t get you into Heaven anymore
They’re already overcrowded from your dirty little war
Now Jesus don’t like killin’, no matter what the reason’s for
And your flag decal won’t get you into Heaven anymore”

John Prine- Sam Stone

Here’s another John Prine song for you! Featured on Rolling Stone’s “Reader’s Poll: The 10 Saddest Songs of All Time,” it’s “Sam Stone,” a song about a war veteran returning home and turning to heroin. Sam Stone dies at the end of this song “when he popped his last balloon.” If Sam Stone’s story doesn’t convince you that soldiers need better access to mental health programs when they return from combat, nothing will. If you want to help, you can donate to The Soldiers Project here.

“Sam Stone came home,
To the wife and family
After serving in the conflict overseas.
And the time that he served,
Had shattered all his nerves,
And left a little shrapnel in his knees.”

The 2016 Election 

Brandi Carlile– “The Joke

Feeling defeated after the 2016 election? Yeah, I know it’s been over a year and half but some of us are still dealing with this. Brandi Carlile’s “The Joke” looks at others who are also feeling this way. According to Brandi, “There are so many people feeling misrepresented [today],” she said. “So many people feeling unloved. Boys feeling marginalized and forced into these kind of awkward shapes of masculinity that they do or don’t belong in… so many men and boys are trans or disabled or shy. Little girls who got so excited for the last election, and are dealing with the fallout. The song is just for people that feel under-represented, unloved or illegal.”

Despite the content of this song, Brandi still manages to provide a glimmer of hope. As she sings, she’s been to the movies, she’s seen how this ends, and the joke is on them. Gee, I sure hope she’s right!

“They come to kick dirt in your face
To call you weak and then displace you
After carrying your baby on your back across the desert
I saw your eyes behind your hair
And you’re looking tired, but you don’t look scared”

American Aquarium– “The World Is On Fire

How many of us can relate to waking up on November 9, 2016 and thinking that the world was on fire? (Probably a majority of us but I won’t get into that here. Stupid electoral college.) This song provides a sense of comfort in knowing that you weren’t the only person feeling this way that Wednesday morning. I always get emotional when I hear BJ Barham, American Aquarium frontman, sing the words below. Thanks for raising your daughter right, BJ!

“I got a baby girl comin’ in the spring
I worry ’bout the world she’s comin’ into
But she’ll have my fight, she’ll have her mama’s fire
If anyone builds a wall in her journey
Baby, bust right through it”

American Aquarium- Tough Folks

Another American Aquarium song? You bet! And this time they’re serving up a big heapin’ portion of hope by reminding you that “tough times don’t last, tough folks do.” Stay strong, folks!

“And last November I saw firsthand
What desperation makes good people do”

Willie Nelson– “Delete and Fast Forward” 

Delete and fast forward? If only it were that easy, Willie! I keep hitting the fast forward button but it seems like these four years are passing by at a snail’s pace. I guess if Willie can make it until 2020 then so can the rest of us!

“Delete and fast-forward, my son
The elections are over and nobody won
You think it’s all endin’ but it’s just settin’ in
So delete and fast-forward, my friend”

The Environment 

Andrew Combs– “Dirty Rain

A song about the environment? Andrew Combs is a man after my own heart (I write this as I sit drinking out of my reusable Starbucks cup). While I go back and forth on the whole “wanting to have kids someday thing,” one reason for my not wanting to is the fact that the environment only seems to be getting worse. Why would I want to have kids just so they can play in the “dirty rain,” as Andrew sings?

“Flattened static, paved in progress’s name
But what will all our little children say
When the only place to play
Is in the dirty rain” 

Father John Misty– “Things It Would Have Been Helpful to Know Before the Revolution

If you don’t care about the “bright blue marble” that we all live on, maybe watching the music video for this song can convince you otherwise. Perhaps iPhones turned into artifacts in a post-apocalyptic world will speak to you. The puppets from this video, which was directed by Chris Hopewell, were auctioned off and the proceeds were given to the Environmental Defense Fund. If you care about the environment, like I assume Father John Misty a.k.a. Josh Tillman does, then consider donating to this fund as well. Or, better yet, start recycling, reducing your waste, and eating less meat. You can also take part in Plastic Free July and join the challenge to refuse single-use plastic this month. And why stop there? Keep it going all twelve months!

Aaaannndddd…if you purchase anything from FJM’s web store between July 2nd – 6th, he’ll be donating all merchandise profits to the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES). You’ve still got two more days!

“It got too hot and so we overthrew the system
‘Cause there’s no place for human existence like right here
On this bright blue marble orbited by trash
Man, there’s no beating that
It was no big thing to give up the way of life we had, oh”

Hurray for the Riff Raff- Rican Beach

I’ll let Alynda Lee Segarra of Hurray for the Riff Raff tell you about this song in her own words, “‘Rican Beach’ is a fictional place and the song is a cautionary tale.” “It tells the story of a city progressing rapidly into militarized and segregated areas. There’s a lot of symbolism in the song that reflects our times, of course. I felt the water protectors at Standing Rock and the people of Peñuelas were important to reflect on while listening to the lyrics. The point of view is one of resistance, people of color claiming their space and their right to exist. It is about claiming ancestry and recognizing a history of facing systemic oppression while protecting and connecting with the land. Even though it was written about an urban space, I think it speaks to the actions of these activists who are connected with the earth.”

American Politics in General

Particle Kid– “Everything is Bullshit

He’s not wrong. Everything kind of is bullshit. The song’s title was inspired by Particle Kid’s (a.k.a. Micah Nelson who happens to be the son of Willie Nelson) girlfriend who said the phrase one day while watching the news. As Micah says, “To me it’s a healing song about facing the reality of how weird and out of control reality is, and finding some humor in there.”

“Post a picture for your Facebook 
Make a profile on your Snapchat
Murder people from a distance
Laugh at videos of cats”

Margo Price– “All American Made

One of my favorite things about Margo Price is that she sings about the ugly things that America is guilty of like the pay gap and the Iran-Contra Affair. Yep, the Iran-Contra Affair. Bet you never thought that would come up in an Americana song much less one that was released thirty years after the scandal took place. If you don’t remember the Iran-Contra Affair (I wasn’t even born yet), a condensed version of what happened is the following: “It consisted of three interconnected parts: The Reagan administration sold arms to Iran, a country desperate for materiel during its lengthy war with Iraq; in exchange for the arms, Iran was to use its influence to help gain the release of Americans held hostage in Lebanon; and the arms were purchased at high prices, with the excess profits diverted to fund the Reagan-favored “contras” fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua.” Hey, what can I say? It was “All American Made.”

“1987 and I didn’t know it then
Reagan was selling weapons to the leaders of Iran
And it won’t be the first time and, baby, it won’t be the end
They were all American made”

Todd Snider– “Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican, Straight, White, American Males

Yeah, just hearing that title makes me scoff. Remember when Jason Isbell said it was a “white man’s world”? Well, it’s actually a conservative Christian, right-wing Republican, straight, white, American man’s world. However, this isn’t a new thing, it was this way in 2004 when this song was released, and it was that way long before. If you aren’t familiar with the creature of the “conservative Christian, right-wing Republican, straight, white, American male,” allow Todd Snider to fill you in.

“Conservative Christian, right wing Republican
Straight, white, American males
Gay bashin’, black fearin’
Poor fightin’, tree killin’
Regional leaders of sales
Frat housin’, keg tappin’
Shirt tuckin’, back slappin’
Haters of hippies like me
Tree huggin’, peace lovin’
Pot smokin’, porn watchin’
Lazy-ass hippies like me”


Childish Gambino– “This is America”

This song is not Americana but I would be remiss not to include it here. I’m also not going to include any lyrics here as a way to encourage you to watch the video instead. Take the next four minutes and four seconds to really watch this video. But really, is there anybody out there who HASN’T seen this yet? And do they live under a rock?

Paul Cauthen– “Everybody Walkin’ This Land

While this may be a song encouraging people “to get right with God,” I hear it as a call to people to just get right. Period. Especially the racists, fascists, and bigots Paul Cauthen references in this song. This song is political to me, and earns a spot on this list, because of the very fact that he calls out fascists. Y’all need to get right!

“You racists and fascists and nihilists and bigots, I’m callin’ you out my friend”

Peter Dawson– “Willie Nelson For President” 

He’d make a better president than the one we’ve got that’s for sure, though I feel like he may be a single-issue politician. You already know the issue. Also, if this ever happens, I’ve already got the bumper sticker for it! I wonder who he would choose as his VP?

My turntable

“If I could I’d vote for Willie to run our government
“Good mornin’ America, how are you?” He’d say with his pigtails and a grin
He would unite the whole nation with his guitar and his song
It’s the only thing that makes perfect sense
Willie Nelson for President”

Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real– “High Times

Including this as a political song might be a bit of a stretch but if his dad can run for president (see above), surely Lukas Nelson can as well, as he sings in this song, “I’m gonna run for president, vote for me, I’m heaven sent.” I’m not opposed to a Nelson family dynasty in the least. Perhaps his campaign slogan could be, “It’s High Time You Vote for Lukas Nelson”?

“I’m gonna die for CNN
Believing in the dream I’m in
I’m gonna die for Fox News
For skewed views
And twisted spews”

Bryan Lewis– “I Think My Dog’s a Democrat

I wanna be friends with this dog. Besides the obvious reason that dogs are awesome this particular dog appears to have good taste in politics. Perhaps he might be interested in the same Donald Trump chew toy I bought for my dog? You can find this toy (also available for cats) for sale here and on Amazon.

titan
Titan and Trump (Christmas 2017)

“I pay for all his healthcare and I buy everything he eats
I provide him with a place to live just to keep him off the streets.
Well, he just acts like he’s entitled,
Even tried to unionize the cat,
Yeah, I think my dog’s a Democrat.”

Neil Young and Promise of the Real– “Already Great

Leave it to a Canadian (Neil Young) to tell us that our country is already great! For all those wanting to make America great again, Neil Young is here to tell you that it’s already great! And he’s brought along his American friends, Promise of the Real, to help him relay his message. The song’s bridge is “no wall, no ban, no fascist USA.” While there are some nasty people calling for walls and bans, there are also Americans marching in the streets calling for “no wall, no ban.” It’s the latter of these two that make America “already great.”

I do have a question for Neil Young though- if he thinks America is already great, what does he think of our lovely neighbor to the north, his home country, dear old Canada?? I’ll go drool over pictures of Justin Trudeau while I wait for his response.

16425753_10207419474836148_112399123984105874_n.jpg
Takin’ it to the streets! (January 2017)

If you like this song, you’ll also like “When Bad Got Good,” also from The Visitor album. Throughout the song the words “lock him up” are chanted and the phrase “liar in chief” comes up.

“No wall
No ban…

Not my words
That’s just you the other day out on that street
(My American friend)
You’re looking at one of the lucky ones
Came here from there to be free”

Aaron Lee Tasjan– “If Not Now When

Invoking Hillel the Elder, though maybe not purposefully, this song is a “call to action” of sorts. If the things above bother you- gun violence, global warming, the pay gap- do something about it. Vote for politicians who care about the environment, who want common sense gun laws, who value women. Call your representatives, donate money, even if you only have a little, to organizations like the ACLU, Texas Civil Rights Project, the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), and if you can’t donate your money, donate your time. Educate yourself and those around you. Speak out when you see injustice. Do what you can NOW. Because, as Aaron Lee Tasjan sings, “if not now, when?”

“Over and over again
You try and try to pretend
That it’s never gonna be the end
If not now, when?
If not now, when?”

America the Beautiful, despite her flaws

While I could have gone in another direction for this 4th of July post and posted about the most patriotic country songs out there, I wanted to instead highlight the artists out there singing about real problems facing this country. Rather than just singing about how much they love America and ignoring her flaws, they’re bringing attention to her flaws. You can still love your country and be critical of it. Wanting your country to be better because you care about her and her people is the best kind of patriotism.

You’ll also notice that with a few exceptions most of these songs fall under the “Americana” category. I’m not sure if mainstream country artists are singing about these issues because honestly I haven’t listened to country radio in quite some time. My guess is that they’re not. In fact, I just scrolled through the list of top country songs and if the song titles are any indication, they definitely aren’t (though maybe Luke Bryan’s “Most People Are Good” could be an exception to the rule.) Singing about politics and real issues would put them at risk of not being played on the radio and it’s all about that airplay, right? (Sarcasm!) It’s the courage displayed by the artists above to sing about these topics and about what they believe in that has steered me away from mainstream country and into the world of Americana.

If you like the songs above and the subjects they address, you should also check out my “That Good Ole Liberal Country Music (Yep, you read that right!)” post, which deals with topics like the confederate flag and the LGBT community and features Steve Earle and Kacey Musgraves.

So while some of you may be cranking up the Toby Keith and Lee Greenwood today, I’ll be listening to these guys and gals! All of the songs mentioned above can be found on a Spotify playlist I’ve created for this post. I’ve also included the liberal country music songs found in my other post on this playlist. Of course, this list isn’t comprehensive so if you’ve got any other political songs (from any genre) that I may have missed from the past few years, let me know!

Happy 4th, everyone! 

Currently listening to: Turnpike Troubadours- “The Bird Hunters.” While this song doesn’t fit in with the other songs listed above, it does mention the 4th of July. I had the privilege of seeing them perform this song on Saturday night at the 9:30 club.

Turnpike Troubadours at the 9:30 Club (June 30, 2018)

“And a flutter of feathers
Then a shotgun to shoulder
I thought of the Fourth of July
She’ll be home on the Fourth of July
I bet we’ll dance on the Fourth of July”

The Tracks I’ve Been Playing So Far in 2018 (Second Quarter)

What I’m Listening To

This past quarter (April-June), I’ve been getting deep into certain artists/groups. Groups like the Turnpike Troubadours and Arctic Monkeys and artists like Cody Jinks and Nikki Lane. One group that’s made a big impression on me are the Turnpike Troubadours. I’ve fallen hard for this sexy sextet. While their latest album (mentioned below), is first-rate, their old stuff is just as amazing. With songs like “Time of Day,” “Long Hot Summer Day,” and “Gin, Smoke, Lies” these guys are definitely gonna go down as one of my favorite bands and Evan Felker‘s name will forever have a place on my list of favorite songwriters. AND I’ll be seeing these guys tonight in concert at the 9:30 Club along with Charley Crockett.

Albums I’m Loving  

Before getting into the singles, I’ll start off with albums that I’m loving. While most of these albums were released in 2018 there are a few from 2017 listed below as well.

2018
Brandi Carlile
By the Way, I Forgive You (Top songs: “Every Time I Hear That Song,” “Sugartooth,” “Hold Out Your Hand,” “The Joke“- basically the entire album) (You can read about me seeing Brandi perform all of the songs off her new album in concert here)
John PrineThe Tree of Forgiveness (Top songs: “Egg & Daughter Nite, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1967,” “Summer’s End“)
Kacey MusgravesGolden Hour (Top songs: “Oh, What a World,” “High Horse,” “Happy & Sad” (Read my album review of Golden Hour here)
American Aquarium– Things Change (Top songs: “The World Is On Fire,” “Crooked+Straight“)
Dierks Bentley– The Mountain (Top songs: “The Mountain“, “Woman, Amen,” “My Religion“) (Brandi Carlile also makes an appearance on the album in the song “Travelin’ Light.”)
Sarah Shook & The Disarmers– Years (Top songs: “Good as Gold,” “Parting Words”) (I saw Sarah and her band back in April and I’ve already got tickets to see them again in October when they roll back through DC!)
Mary GauthierRifles and Rosary Beads (Top songs: “Brothers” and “Bullet Holes in the Sky“)
2017
Turnpike Troubadours– A Long Way from Your Heart (Top songs: “The Housefire,” “Something to Hold On To“)
Lilly HiattTrinity Lane (Top songs: “The Night David Bowie Died,” “So Much You Don’t Know“) (I got to see Lilly Hiatt in concet in May- read about it here!)
Nikki Lane– Highway Queen (Top songs: “Foolish Heart,” “Lay You Down“)
Dan Auerbach– Waiting on a Song (Top songs: “Never In My Wildest Dreams,” “Stand by My Girl“)
Sarah Shook & The Disarmers- Sidelong (Top songs: “Dwight Yoakam,” “Fuck Up“) (Yeah, I know she’s got two albums listed here but she released two great albums in back to back years, what can I say?)

The Tracks I’ve Been Playing (from 2018)

*in alphabetical order  

And now, for the singles. As you’ll notice, I’ve stayed true to my pattern of including both brand new songs and songs that are several years (or more) old.  I’ve put all of the songs from 2018 together and then broken up the older stuff below. I’ve also decided to just list these out without my usual commentary on each song (with a few exceptions) because 1) I figure most of you don’t care and 2) this list is pretty long and ain’t nobody got time for that!

Blackberry Smoke- “I’ll Keep Rambin‘”
Leon Bridges- “
Beyond
Brothers Osborne- “
Pushing Up Daisies (Love Alive),” “I Don’t Remember Me (Before You),” “Slow Your Roll (all from their new album Port Saint Joe)
The Brummies (feat. Kacey Musgraves)- “
Drive Away
Paul Cauthen-
Everybody Walkin’ This Land,” “Resignation” (both from his new EP Have Mercy)
Childish Gambino– “This Is America” (watch the video!)
Charley Crockett– “Ain’t Gotta Worry Child
Brent Cobb– “King of Alabama
Dawes- Living in the Future
Jade Bird– “Lottery
Jeff Hyde– “Old Hat
Jewel– “Body On Body” (from Johnny Cash: Forever Words, an album based off of the poetry of Johnny Cash.)
Ruston Kelly– “Asshole
Ruston Kelly (feat. Kacey Musgraves)- “To June This Morning” (also from Johnny Cash: Forever Words, an album based off of the poetry of Johnny Cash. You can learn more about this song from husband and wife Ruston and Kacey here.) 
Shooter Jennings- “
Rhinestone Eyes
Cody Jinks
– “Must be The Whiskey” (from his upcoming album Lifers, which will be released July 27th)
Ashley Monroe– “Hands on You,” “Rita,” “Paying Attention” (Her new album Sparrow is pretty great- and it was produced by none other than Dave Cobb!)
Kacey Musgraves– “Roy Rogers” (Elton John cover from Restoration: The Songs Of Elton John and Bernie Taupin)
Willie Nelson– “Last Man Standing
Old Crow Medicine Show– “Look Away
Lindi Ortega– “The Comeback Kid” (read about the Lindi Ortega concert I attended in April here)
Erin Rae– “Putting on Airs
Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats– “You Worry Me
Amanda Shires– “Leave It Alone
Caitlyn Smith– “St. Paul,” “Do You Think About Me” (both from her album Starfire)
Justin Timberlake feat. Chris Stapleton– “Say Something
Sadler Vaden– “Monster” (can’t seem to find this on YouTube but it’s on my Spotify playlist)
Shakey Graves– “My Neighbor
Western Centuries– “Own Private Honky Tonk,” “Wild You Run
The Wild Feathers– “Big Sky

The Tracks I’ve Been Playing (not from 2018)

*in alphabetical order

American Aquarium- Wolves” (2015)
Ryan Bingham-
Bread & Water,” “Sunrise” (2007)
The Black Keys– “Little Black Submarine,” “Gold on the Ceiling” (2011) (Yeah, I know I’m late to The Black Keys party. Sorry, my invitation got lost in the mail!)
Leon Bridges– “Twistin’ & Groovin’” (2015)
Tyler Childers– “Play Me a Hank Song,” “Bottles And Bibles” (2011)
Slaid Cleaves-
God’s Own Yodeler,” “Texas Love Song” (2013)
Charley Crockett-
Jamestown Ferry” (2017)
Ward Davis
(feat. Jamey Johnson and Willie Nelson)Old Wore out Cowboys,” “I Got You” (reminds me of a modern day version of Waylon and Willie’s “I Can Get off on You“) (2015)
Dave Rawlings Machine– “The Weekend” (2015)
Dawes– “A Little Bit Of Everything” (2011) (this song get me misty-eyed!) 
The Dead South- “
In Hell I’ll Be In Good Company(watch the video!) (2014)
The Devil Makes Three– “All Hail” (2009)
Dispatch– “Curse + Crush,” “Midnight Lorry” (2017)
Justin Townes Earle– “Harlem River Blues,” “One More Night In Brooklyn” (2010) (Read about me seeing him in concert in May here)
Dom Flemons– “Too Long I’ve Been Gone” (2014)
Shakey Graves– “Dearly Departed (with Esmé Patterson),” “Roll the Bones” (I’ve included live versions of these songs since this is the way they were introduced to me and it’s the only version of “Roll the Bones” that I listen to)
William Clark Green– “Ringling Road” (2015)
Patty Griffin– “Making Pies” (2002)
Cris Jacobs– “Jack the Whistle and the Hammer,” “Hallelujah Hustler” (2016)
Jamestown Revival- Midnight Hour” (2016)
Shooter Jennings
– “I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone” (2016)
Reckless Kelly– “Wicked Twisted Road” (2005)
The Head and the Heart– “Shake” (2013)
Natalie Hemby– “Cairo, IL” (2017) (I kinda wanna go here now)
Zephaniah OHora– “High Class City Girl from the Country” (2017)
Hurray For the Riff Raff– “Rican Beach” (2017)
Lucero– “Went Looking for Warren Zevon’s Los Angeles” (2015)
Lillie Mae- Honest and True” (2017)
James McMurty
– “Long Island Sound,” “You Got to Me” (2015) (He was the opening act for Jason Isbell when I saw him back in February. Apparently he’s Jason’s favorite songwriter. And Jason is one of my favorite songwriters. So I guess this guy is partially to thank for that.)
Nikki Lane– “Gone, Gone, Gone” (2011), “All or Nothin’” (2014)
Parker Milsap– “Wherever You Are” (2016)
John Moreland– “Hang Me in the Tulsa County Stars” (2015) “Love Is Not an Answer” (2017)
Esmé Patterson– “No River,” (2016) “Tumbleweed” (2014) (from her album Woman to Woman, which is a concept album written as a response to famous songs about women. This one is about Townes Van Zandt’s “Loretta.” Other songs include “Never Chase A Man” about Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” and “Bluebird” about The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby.”)
Chris Stapleton– “Scarecrow in the Garden,” “Hard Livin’” (2017) (I prefer the version of “Hard Livin'” with Sturgill Simpson from SNL, but hey, that might just be me!)
The Steel Woods– “Let the Rain Come Down,” “Better in the Fall,” “If We Never Go” (2017) (So I will add some quick commentary on this band because I saw them in concert earlier in June. These guys have a great Southern rock sound and I enjoyed hearing them play their own stuff along with some covers including “Yesterday’s Wine,” “Whipping Post,” and “Lonesome, On’ry, and Mean” at Jammin’ Java in Vienna, VA.)
Twin Forks– “Can’t Be Broken” (the Audiotree Live Version) , “Cross My Mind,” “Back to You” (2014) (Late to the game in finding this group but after seeing Dashboard Confessional in concert back in March it was brought to my attention that Chris Carrabba (swoon!) has a folk band and they’re pretty good!)
Uncle Lucius– “Keep the Wolves Away” (2013)
Colter Wall– “Sleeping on the Blacktop,” “The Devil Wears a Suit and Tie,” (2015) “Thirteen Silver Dollars” (2017) (Read about my experience seeing Colter Wall in concert here)
Willie Watson– “Gallows Pole” (2017)
Whiskey Myers– “Stone” (2016)
The Wild Feathers– “The Ceiling” (2013)
Jack White– “Honey, We Can’t Afford to Look This Cheap” (2007)
Wrinkle Neck Mules– “Whistlers & Sparklers” (2015)
Yellow Feather– “If You Ain’t Cheatin’” (2017)

The Tracks I’ve Been Playing (from WAY before 2018)

*in alphabetical order

The Allman Brothers Band- Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More” (1972)
Guy Clark-
Anyhow, I Love You” (1976), “Dublin Blues” (1995)
Dramarama- Anything, Anything [I’ll Give You]” (1990)
Tom T. Hall- Faster Horses” (1976) (this song makes a great addition to any Kentucky Derby playlist!) 
Elton John-
Honky Cat” (1972) “The Bitch Is Back” (1974) (I’ve always loved Elton John but with the recent release of Restoration: The Songs Of Elton John and Bernie Taupin, which features artists like Kacey Musgraves (see above), Lee Ann Womack, and Miley Cyrus, I was reminded of how many songs this man has gifted to us.) 
Robert Earl Keen-
Feeling Good Again” (1998)
Kris Kristofferson– “The Taker” (1971)
Lyle Lovett– “If I Had A Boat” (1987) (Lovett or leave it, you gotta admire this man. I mainly just wanted an excuse to say “Lovett or Leave It”)
James McMurty– “Every Little Bit Counts” (1998)
Old 97’s– “Barrier Reef” (1997), “Champaign, Illinois” (2010)
John Prine– “Ain’t Hurtin’ Nobody” (1995), “Please Don’t Bury Me” (1973)
Willis Alan Ramsey– “Northeast Texas Women,” “Geraldine And the Honeybee” (1972) (These songs are from the only album that Willis Alan Ramsey ever released, a self-titled album. Ramsey is a cult legend among fans of Americana and Texas country. Apparently he will be releasing his second album (46 years later!) at some point in the near future.)
Billy Joe Shaver– “Live Forever” (1993)
Townes Van Zandt– “I’ll Be Here in the Morning” (1968), “If I Needed You” (1972- that’s the fourth song from 1972 in this itty bitty section- must’ve been a good year for music!)
Whiskeytown– “16 Days” (1997)
Lucinda Williams– “Joy” (1998) (her album Car Wheels On A Gravel Road just celebrated its 20th Anniversary. I’ve enjoyed listening to this album and can see why it’s been so influential in Americana/country music.)

You can find all of the songs referenced above (unless they’re not on Spotify) on my second quarter of 2018 Spotify playlist here. Hopefully I managed to get all of these on there. If you missed my first quarter roundup, you can find that post here.

It Ain’t All Country, All of the Time

As I mentioned above, I’ve gotten into Arctic Monkeys here lately. I first learned about them when I was living in London in 2014 when “Do I Wanna Know?” was a big hit. I hadn’t really listened to them much since that chapter in my life but have recently gotten back into them and found so many more songs I like. Songs like the following:

One For The Road
From the Ritz To The Rubble
Piledriver Waltz
Fluorescent Adolescent
I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor
Arabella
Stop The World I Wanna Get Off With You
Bigger Boys and Stolen Sweethearts
Four Out of Five
Old Yellow Bricks

You can find all of the Arctic Monkeys songs referenced above along with some others on my “Arctic Monkeying Around” Spotify playlist here.

Albums I’m Waiting For

Some albums that will be coming out soon that I’m looking forward to are Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit‘s Live from the Ryman, Cody Jinks‘ Lifers, Amanda Shires’ To the Sunset, and King of the Road, a Roger Miller tribute album featuring Eric Church, Kacey Musgraves, Dolly Parton, and more- well, dang me!

Currently listening to:  Tyler Childers- Live On Red Barn Radio I & II. This vinyl was waiting for me when I got home last night! “Charleston Girl” and “Dead Man’s Curve” are two Tyler classics and are both featured on this album. Here’s to hoping the that the album gets put back up on Spotify so that I can add these songs to my playlists.

My copy of Tyler Childers’ Live On Red Barn Radio I & II  (released June 29, 2018)

May/Early June Concert Roundup

Another month (and some change) have passed which means it’s time for another concert roundup. While I’m always happy that my favorite artists come through DC, my wallet is not. This year I’ve definitely traded in travel (especially international travel) for music. Though I am traveling to Texas this summer, that trip is highly centered around country music. In fact, I’ll be going to a concert while I’m there- Cody Jinks at Whitewater Amphitheater in New Braunfels, Texas. Cody hasn’t come through DC since I’ve had the great fortune of discovering him so if Cody won’t come to me, I’ll go to him! You can find a full list of upcoming shows that I’ll be attending at the end of this post.

Brandi Carlile- The Anthem (May 20th) 

Brandi Carlile‘s concert on May 20th at The Anthem is one I’ll always remember. It was the last night of her tour (and second night in a row at The Anthem) and she went out with a bang! Her new album By the Way, I Forgive You came out earlier this year and is truly a masterpiece. There are certain songs on this album, like the featured song below, that really resonated with me. This album was co-produced by Shooter Jennings and Dave Cobb so you know it’s good. Seriously, Dave Cobb is the King Midas of music- everything this guy touches turns to gold! Seeing her perform these songs live was an emotional experience to say the least. She started the night with the song on the album that hit me the hardest, “Every Time I Hear That Song,” which really choked me up. The struggle to hold back my waterworks also happened during “The Mother” and “The Joke,” both of which are off her latest album (the line in “The Joke” about carrying your baby on your back through the desert got me good!) And of course she played her most famous song, “The Story,” which would make even a statue get a little emotional. She performed every song from By the Way, I Forgive You and that was just fine by me because it meant I got to hear all of my favorite songs off the album like “Sugartooth” and “Hold Out Your Hand.” And as a new Brandi Carlile fan, this album helped launch me into full throttle fandom!

Some highlights from the night included Pete Souza (former Chief Official White House photographer for Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama) joining her and Darlingside, the opening act, on stage to perform during the encore. Together, they ended the night with “Hold Out Your Hand.” Pete is a big fan, which I already knew from following him on Instagram. Before calling him up on stage, Brandi called Pete “the shadiest mother fucker in DC.” That he is. Also, while singing “Hold Out Your Hand,” the lights came on and you could see everyone in the audience clapping their hands and singing along.

One of my favorite things about concerts is when the artists talk with the audience in between songs- I feel like it really gives you a glimpse into their personality. Brandi talked a lot at her show, which I loved. She’s funny and smart and talked about the things that matter most to her like being a mother and her family’s right to exist in this country. She also provided the stories behind some of the songs, like “Fulton County Jane Doe” (that’s an interesting story so look it up if you’ve got the time/inclination). Getting to know Brandi a little better in between her songs was a major highlight of the night!

This past month, the nominees for the Americana Music Honors and Awards were announced and of course Brandi was included in several categories. When the nominees first came out and I saw that Margo Price, Jason Isbell, John Prine, and Brandi Carlile were all nominated for “Artist of the Year,” my first thought was “can there be a four way tie??” Her album is also up for “Album of the Year” and despite being up against The Nashville Sound and All American Made, I can say that Brandi (and this album) deserves this. That’s saying a lot because if you know me you know that Margo Price is my idol and that I absolutely adore Jason Isbell. But guys, her album was THAT good! You can find the full list of nominees here.

Featured song: Brandi Carlile- “Every Time I Hear That Song”

Willie Nelson and Sturgill Simpson with Cris Jacobs- The Anthem (May 27th) 

I was a little apprehensive going into Sunday night’s show. Willie Nelson was supposed to have performed the night before in Charlotte, NC but instead, after two attempts, he tossed his hat out into the audience, never actually performing. This was apparently due to a stomach bug. Thankfully, Willie had recovered enough by the next night to make it out on stage and play a full set. While I do love me some Willie, the main attraction that night was Sturgill Simpson. It was my second time seeing both Willie and Sturgill as I saw both of them back in September (though they weren’t together, I saw them within two days of each other). Unlike the last time I saw Sturgill, the audience was standing during this show, which I thought made the overall experience a lot better. Who can sit still and listen to Sturgill?! I was also five rows back from the stage (shout out to me for always being early and getting to take advantage of that GA seating!) which meant that I really got to see what was happening on stage (well, aside from the annoying couple in front of me who insisted on holding onto each other the entire set and forming one big person instead of two separate people. Y’all suck!) I also got several compliments on my “Who the Fuck is Sturgill Simpson?” t-shirt! I’m thinking that most people there knew who the fuck he was!

I will say that I was a little disappointed that Sturgill and Willie didn’t play a song together. That would have been such a cool performance to witness. Especially since Sturgill covers a song made famous by Willie on his first album- “I’d Have to Be Crazy.” I’m just happy that Willie, at the ripe old age of 85,  is still willing and able to keep performing. As he sings on his latest album Last Man Standing, “I don’t wanna be the last man standin‘, or wait a minute maybe I do.” We’re happy to have you as the last man, Willie!

The opening act that night, Cris Jacobs, was from Baltimore (though two members of the group were from Richmond, VA). I had listened to them a little bit in preparation for that night and really like their sound. A couple songs of theirs worth checking out are “Jack the Whistle and the Hammer” and “The Devil or Jesse James.”

Now that I’ve attended two shows at The Anthem (within a week of each other), I want to say a quick word about this venue because it’s pretty dang cool! I like that the concession stands are in the same room as the performance so you don’t have to worry about missing your favorite song if you get up to grab a drink. I only stayed on the first level though so next time I’m there I’ll be sure to check out the upper levels and give you all a full report.

Featured song: Sturgill Simpson- “Brace For Impact (Live A Little)”

Justin Townes Earle with Lilly Hiatt- The Birchmere (May 29th) 

When I first bought tickets to this show I must not have realized that Lilly Hiatt was also performing. After realizing it much later, I was pleasantly surprised to see her name on the lineup. With the release of her latest album Trinity Lane, I had gotten into Lilly’s music and really taken a liken to her. Getting to see both her and Justin Townes Earle made for a really special night!

Since this was a solo show, both of them played with just their guitar and microphone alone on stage. There were no bands and no big production, which made for an intimate show. And it was at The Birchmere in Alexandria- a cool venue with posters of past performers, like Waylon Jennings and Steve Earle (Justin’s dad!), decorating the hallway. You can also sit down and eat during the show. Warning: if you get the fish tacos, they are messy!

If we’re being honest, I liked Justin’s stories and commentary more than the music portion of the night. What’s great about small venues like The Birchmere is that artists feel more comfortable talking with the audience. The fact that this was a solo show also helped in that regard. I’m glad Justin felt comfortable enough to talk with us because he shared some crazy stories about his past (and also provided BBQ recommendations if you’re ever in Memphis). Sitting close to the stage at a solo show is also pretty neat because you get to really see the artist as they’re singing their songs. Justin does this thing where he makes little noises between verses sometimes. While I’m not sure why he does that, I like it. He’s also an incredible guitar player- being able to watch his hands on his guitar as he played each song was something to see! In between stories, Justin did manage to play some songs including his own stuff like “One More Night In Brooklyn” in addition to some blues songs.

What’s cool about both Justin and Lilly is that they’re the children of famous musicians- Justin Townes Earle being the son of Steve Earle and Lilly Hiatt being the daughter of John Hiatt. Justin’s namesake is also the late great Townes Van Zandt. But don’t think these two are just riding on their daddys’ names- they’re talented singers, songwriters, and musicians in their own right.

You can’t be the son of Steve Earle without getting political (check out my post on liberal country music featuring Steve Earle here). And that’s not a bad thing, in fact, we need more Steves and Justins in music now more than ever. Justin brought up the opiate crisis on stage and asked why something is only a crisis when white kids start dying from it. He elaborated on this topic and encouraged us to ask the right questions to people who are dealing with addiction. Instead of asking something insensitive like “what’s wrong with you?” or questions like that why not ask “why do you hurt?” Asking the right questions is a step in the right direction to understanding addiction and the crises that come from it. I’m sure someone in the audience needed to hear Justin’s words that night.

A highlight of the night was meeting Lilly. She was very personable and I loved that she came out after her set and after Justin’s set to greet fans and sign merchandise. I told her that I was going to Margo Price’s show on Friday and she told me to say hi to Margo and that Margo would like me. Though, as expected, I didn’t get the chance to meet Margo at her show a couple of nights later. I also think Margo is way too cool for me! I should also take this opportunity to mention that Lilly is a nominee for “Emerging Artist of the Year” for the Americana Music Honors and Awards. If you haven’t checked out her new album Trinity Lane yet, you need to get on that!

One cool piece of merchandise that I picked up at the show was a cassette tape of Justin’s Kids in the Street album. Problem is I don’t have a cassette player. Even still, it makes for a cool addition to my music collection. While vinyl has been back in style for a while now, I don’t actually see cassettes making a return.

Featured songs: Justin Townes Earle- “Harlem River Blues” and Lilly Hiatt “The Night David Bowie Died”


Margo Price and John Prine- Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts (June 1st)

Because this show was so early in June, I decided to include it in this post. What a night- I got to see Margo Price, who I’ve been a big fan of for quite some time, open up for John Prine, one of my songwriting idols. It was also my first time at Wolf Trap, which is a really beautiful venue.

I’ve been wanting to see Miss Margo Price in concert for quite some time and on Friday night that dream finally came true. When she’s not warning you about the “cocaine cowboys” she’s getting real about politics singing about issues like the pay gap and the Iran-Contra Scandal. (Though she didn’t sing any of those songs on Friday night). She also knows how to kick back and have fun as evidenced in songs like “Hurtin’ (On The Bottle).” I was happy that she performed stuff from her first album Midwest Farmer’s Daughter in addition to her new stuff. Her first album really helped make me a fan of Americana music. She was one of the first artists in that genre that really stood out to me and songs like “Hands of Time” and “How the Mighty Have Fallen” really made an impression on me. Getting to hear her perform “Hands of Time” and “Tennessee Song” that night was really special.

Friday night was my second time seeing the incredible (and one of my favorite singer/songwriters) John Prine live and oh boy was he great! His new album, The Tree of Forgiveness, came out on April 13th. Fun fact: I share a birthday with this album! I feel honored to share this day with such a great album. On The Tree of Forgiveness, Prine proves that he’s still got it (as if there was ever any doubt)! There are so many great songs on this album, adding themselves to the catalog of wonderful songs he has amassed in his lifetime. Songs like the summertime anthem, “Knockin’ On Your Screen Door” and a happy perspective on the afterlife, “When I Get To Heaven.”

The brightest highlight of the night included John and Margo singing “In Spite of Ourselves” together. I had hoped that Prine would seize upon the opportunity of having Margo there and decide to do this duet! Another highlight was Prine talking to the audience. This man is hilarious! A memorable quote of his from the night came right before he played “Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore.” He said that he wrote that song in 1968 as a political song and it’s still a political song today. But he’ll keep playing it until they get it right! Here’s to hoping that one day John Prine doesn’t have to play this song anymore!

This post is chock full of Americana Music Honors and Awards nominees including both Margo and John. Both are nominated for “Artist of the Year” (along with Brandi Carlile and Jason Isbell). John won last year so I’m not sure what the chances are that he’ll win again, but hey, it’s possible! Margo is also nominated for “Album of the Year” for All American Made and for “Song of the Year” for “A Little Pain.”

Featured songs: John Prine- “Egg and Daughter Nite, Lincoln Nebraska, 1967” and Margo Price- “Hands of Time”

Upcoming Concerts (* means tickets are already purchased)

*6/8- The Steel Woods at Jammin’ Java
*6/29- Turnpike Troubadours and Charley Crockett at Friday Cheers (Richmond, VA)
*6/30– Turnpike Troubadours and Charley Crockett at 9:30 Club (yeah, I’ve got it on here twice. I may skip the Richmond show and go to the DC one but still TBD.)
*7/6- Cody Jinks, Colter Wall, and Ward Davis at Whitewater Amphitheater (New Braunfels, TX)
*7/21– Ray Wylie Hubbard at City Winery DC
7/22– Lori McKenna at City Winery DC
7/24- Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit at Wolf Trap
*7/25- Nikki Lane at Rock & Roll Hotel
7/28– Arctic Monkeys at The Anthem (this show is already sold out but I’m hoping that some cheap ones appear on StubHub)
8/2– Amanda Shires and Sean Rowe at The Birchmere
8/22– Shooter Jennings at City Winery
*9/12– Sarah Shook and the Disarmers at Pearl Street Warehouse
9/28– Jade Bird at Rock & Roll Hotel
10/5– Turnpike Troubadours at Spring Pavilion (Charlottesville, VA)
10/13- Chris Stapleton’s All-American Road Show at Jiffy Lube Live
10/15- Tyler Childers at 9:30 Club

Currently listening to: Dolly Parton- “The Story.” From Cover Stories: Brandi Carlile Celebrates 10 Years of The Story (An Album to Benefit War Child). This is a charity tribute album featuring various artists like Margo Price, Kris Kristofferson, and of course, Dolly Parton.

April Concert Roundup

A Month of Firsts

April has been a crazy month- from my 28th birthday, to work events, to spending time with friends, it’s been a busy month. And in the midst of all the craziness of a wedding (not mine), a baby shower (also not mine), and birthday celebrations (those were mine), I also attended five concerts in April. This month was a month of many firsts- all five of the concerts were for artists that I’d never seen before and four of the venues were places I’d never been before. April also saw my first mechanical bull ride, first Jewish wedding, and first time taking part in Record Store Day (shout out to me for scoring the Eric Church RSD release!) With the constant busyness of life, I need to remind myself that being busy is a blessing- it means I’ve got a job, I’ve got friends, and I’ve got interests that I’m able to pursue. Interests like the many live music events that I get to attend, like the ones below!

Dom Flemons Duo- Pearl Street Warehouse (April 4th) 

April 4th, 2018 marked several firsts for me: my first time at the Wharf, my first time at Pearl Street Warehouse, my first time seeing Dom Flemons, and my first time seeing someone play the bones. Yes, the bones. It’s an actual musical instrument and Dom played them for us that night. There were also some for sale at the merchandise table. You might know Dom from his former band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which he was in with Rhiannon Giddens. For his CD release that night, Dom performed some tunes from his new album Black Cowboys. He also did an interview on stage for the Smithsonian (Smithsonian Folkways, maybe? I don’t remember) where he discussed some of the songs and the history behind them. This man knows his stuff and is an exceptionally talented musician and singer too!

Featured song: Caroline Chocolate Drops- “Hit ‘Em Up Style” (no, Dom didn’t play this for us that night but who doesn’t love a Blu Cantrell cover??)

Colter Wall- U Street Music Hall (April 7th) 

The devil might wear a suit and tie but Colter Wall wears deeply unbuttoned shirts. Well, at least he was at his show at U Street Music Hall on April 7th. Since I reference this song, I’ll get my complaining out of the way- Colter Wall didn’t play “The Devil Wears a Suit and Tie”!! When my friend asked him why after the show he said they were rushing him off. That’s understandable, especially since there was a 10:30 p.m. show after his. But still. How do you not perform one of your top songs?! I won’t dwell on this too much especially since he did play some of his other hits including “Sleeping on the Blacktop” and “Motorcycle.” He was also hanging around after the show by his van and agreed to take pictures with his fans (see mine below), which was cool!

Just a few quick words on Colter Wall that have nothing to do with his performance. For me, Colter’s music brings to mind the artists and songs of country past- his song “Thirteen Silver Dollars” could be inspired by Emmylou Harris, the “Queen of the Silver Dollar,” as he makes a reference to having a “belly full of baby’s bluebird wine” (if you don’t get the reference, she has a song called “Bluebird Wine.”) He also makes a “Blue Yodel No. 9” reference in this song. Then there’s “Sleeping on the Blacktop,” which, in my opinion, sounds similar to Johnny Cash’s “God’s Gonna Cut You Down.” His song “Fraulein” is also a cover song, which was written in 1957 by Lawton Williams and first sung by Bobby Helms. Townes Van Zandt also did a cover of this song. It gives me hope that there are country artists out there who are able to pull from the sounds of the past and bring them into the present. Colter Wall is definitely one of those artists.

After the show, it was brought up by one of the people that I attended the show with that his murder ballad “Kate McCannon,” one of his most famous songs, promotes violence against women. That really got me thinking. Where do we draw the line between what we support in real life and what we’re willing to accept in our music? Late last month I participated in the March for Our Lives and yet a few weeks later I’m listening to Colter Wall singing about putting three rounds into a cheating Kate McCannon. Listening to, and even liking, songs that go against my own personal beliefs is an issue I struggle with. This is especially the case with country music- a genre that often glorifies things that I do not support in my personal life. The killing of one’s spouse is not a theme reserved solely for the men though as women also kill their husbands in country songs. This led to a discussion about the songs in country music where women are the the ones killing their spouses. Songs like Garth Brooks’ “The Thunder Rolls” and the Dixie Chicks’ “Goodbye Earl” being two of the first examples that came to mind. Is a woman killing her abusive husband more acceptable than a man killing his cheating wife? I won’t get into that here since this is just a concert write-up but I think a post dedicated to this topic is worth writing at some point. I’ll hopefully get around to writing that some day.

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Colter Wall and I (April 7, 2018)

Featured song: Colter Wall- “The Devil Wears a Suit and Tie” (because he didn’t play it that night!)

Ruby Boots- Songbyrd Music House and Record Cafe (April 10th) 

The show at Songbyrd on April 10th was super intimate. For the most part it was just Ruby Boots and her friend on stage playing guitar and electric guitar then later in the night it was just a solo Ruby Boots. No drummer, no fiddler, just Ruby and her mate (she’s Australian so I said mate). While I wish more people had come out to support her, having a small group there was nice. Ruby Boots was cracking jokes and telling stories, including one about Bill Murray. She also mentioned that she’s friends with Nikki Lane, who I love. I bet hanging out with those two would be so much fun! It was a real treat getting to hear about Ruby Boots’ personal life and the stories behind some of the songs. I’m not sure if she would have been as engaged with the crowd had there been a large group there. I also love her Australian accent! Aussies rule, mate!

One joke she made was about her new album. She told us that the album is titled Don’t Talk About It, “so don’t tell anybody!” Well, I am telling people- sorry! In addition to singing songs from Don’t Talk About It as well as some of her older songs, she also sang a Tom Petty song and even came off the stage out into the audience with her friend, leaving the guitars behind, to sing an acoustic version of Lucinda Williams’ “Jackson.”

I hope Ruby Boots had fun at Madam’s Organ after the show!

Featured song: Ruby Boots- “It’s So Cruel”

Lindi Ortega and Hugh Masterson- Union Stage (April 24th) 

There’s a great press quote that describes how Lindi Ortega should be onstage- “fun and frightening.” Though I wasn’t really scared at her show, I can understand how she earned this description as some of her songs carry dark themes. Lindi told a story about wanting to sing her song about dying and her guitar player responded with, “Which one? You’ve got six.” I think this anecdote sheds light on the “frightening” side of Lindi. However, it’s the “fun” part (and her shiny red boots) that the fans show up for. Her latest album Liberty is a spaghetti western-esque concept album which follows a character from a dark place in their life to a more happy place at the album’s end. Lindi made sure to play some of the songs from the end of the album (the happy part) to balance out her “frightening” persona. This included songs like “Lovers in Love,” “In the Clear,” and the Spanish song from the album, “Gracias a La Vida.” She also played my favorite song of hers, “Ashes.”

Lindi Ortega and I (April 24, 2018)

Her opening act was someone I had maybe heard of before but had never really listened to. Well, shame on me! Hugh Masterson was really good- not only did I enjoy hearing him sing his songs but his stories in between the songs were funny and helped to counteract the seriousness of his songs’ content. It’s all about that balance!

Featured song: Lindi Ortega- “Afraid of the Dark.” I’ll include this song here because I do like the dark stuff. As Lindi sings, “Don’t get any closer to my heart if you’re afraid of the dark.” Yeah, same.

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers and Zephaniah O’Hora- Pearl Street Warehouse (April 26th) 

Sarah Shook has me all shook up, y’all! I’ll admit that before the show I was so intimidated by this chick. But seeing her on stage and hearing her talk with the audience in between every song, I’m no longer intimidated, as she seems to be really chill and friendly. Actually, the whole band seems to be. Except Kevin- he’s a prima donna (that’s an inside joke only people at the show will get. Sorry, Kevin!) Sarah and her band, the Disarmers, rocked Pearl Street Warehouse on April 26th, which happened to be the first night of their tour. Their songs have an upbeat sound that make lyrics like “I can’t cry myself to sleep so I drink myself to death/I got cocaine in my bloodstream and whiskey on my breath/Ain’t a thing that I can change to get my luck up/I guess I’m just too much of a fuck up” make you wanna get up out your seat and sing along! Her lyrics are raw with lines like “the bottle never lets me down the way you do” and “there’s a hole in my heart ain’t nothin’ here can fill/ But I just keep thinkin’ surely the whiskey will.” Though these lyrics might pack a punch, they’re also served up with a heavy dose of reality thanks to their honesty and Sarah’s delivery. She almost makes you think that you can make it up to mama by getting that “mother-heart tattoo.”

Her opener, Zephaniah O’Hora (yes, his actual name) wasn’t half bad either! I especially liked his song “High Class City Girl from the Country.” He’s from Brooklyn, which I find to be really interesting. This guy goes to show that country really is country wide!

Sarah Shook and the Disarmers (April 26, 2018)

Featured song: Sarah Shook and the Disarmers- “Dwight Yoakam” (is Dwight Yoakam really that anxious??)

Upcoming Concerts (* means tickets are already purchased) 

5/18- The Weight Band feat. members of The Band, Levon Helm Band, & Rick Danko Group at The Hamilton
*5/20- Brandi Carlile at The Anthem
*5/29- Justin Townes Earle- Solo Tour at The Birchmere
*6/1
– Margo Price and John Prine at Wolf Trap
*6/8- The Steel Woods at Jammin’ Java
*6/29- Turnpike Troubadours and Charley Crockett at Friday Cheers (Richmond, VA)
*7/21
– Ray Wylie Hubbard at City Winery
7/24- Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit at Wolf Trap
8/2– Amanda Shires and Sean Rowe at The Birchmere
10/13- Chris Stapleton’s All-American Road Show at Jiffy Lube Live

Currently listening to: Jade Bird- “Lottery.” I felt so bad for missing her set when she opened for Colter Wall so I feel it would only be right to mention her here!

Album Review: Kacey Musgraves- “Golden Hour”

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(Photo courtesy of Stereogum)

It’s finally starting to feel like spring in Washington, DC and Kacey Musgraves’ new album is out today- it really is Good Friday! I’ve been anxiously awaiting Kacey Musgraves’ new album Golden Hour from the moment she announced that it was on its way. With all of the built up anticipation and excitement for this album, I thought this would make the perfect album for my first ever album review. I’ve been trying not to read too much about the new album as I didn’t want other people’s ideas to influence my own. I’ll read some of the other album reviews once this one is posted (like Grady Smith‘s, for example) as I’m curious to know what others thought of the record. 

I’ve been a fan of Kacey Musgraves for several years. The major force that propelled me into full-fledged Kacey fandom was seeing her perform live at “C2C: Country To Country” in London two years ago. Soon after that concert, I bought both of her albums on iTunes and they served as the soundtrack to my spring break in England. While I already had a few songs from Same Trailer Different Park in my iTunes catalog, I finished buying up the rest of the album that day along with Pageant Material. 

In the weeks leading up to Golden Hour‘s release, Kacey put out three songs- “Space Cowboy,” “Butterflies,” and “High Horse.” Of these three, “High Horse” was definitely my favorite with its cheeky lyrics and funky disco beat à la the 1970s. These songs were tasters as they prepared our appetites for the rest of what Kacey would be serving up on this album. 

Oh, What An Album! 

Earlier this week, NPR Music put up the full album for people to stream as a “First Listen“. It was nice not having to wait until today to finally hear this baby in its entirety. My initial reaction to the album was a positive one. And the more I continue to listen to it, the more I fall in love with it. I had heard her sing a little bit of “Oh, What A World” on her Instagram story and was desperately hoping this song would be on the album so that I could hear the full version of it. It was delighted that it was included and I was not disappointed with it. In fact, it’s probably my favorite song on the album (audio video below). The upbeat message of embracing the beautiful things in life (because there is so much ugly out there too) along with the song’s trippy sound really hooked me. Coming in a tie for second place would have to be “Slow Burn” and “Happy & Sad.” “Slow Burn” is the first song on the album and the most autobiographical (watch her performance of this song from last night’s The Late Show with Stephen Colbert). And the more I listen to “Happy & Sad” the more I find myself enjoying it and relating to it. These two are just gonna have to share second place! As much as I enjoy the emotional, introspective, and “all up in your feelings” kinda songs, this album wouldn’t be complete without a dance floor anthem and Kacey’s got that base covered with “High Horse.” Other songs on the album include “Wonder Woman” (no, it’s not about Gal Gadot) and “Rainbow.” Fans who have had the good fortune of hearing her sing “Rainbow” in her live performances will be happy to find this song included. A full track listing is below. 

In typical Kacey fashion, the songwriting on this album is superb- it’s simple yet eloquent. She has a certain way of describing the emotions we all feel in our own unique way in a style that’s universal. “Happy & Sad” is a great example of this as it’s so relatable. Kacey asks, “is there a word for the way that I’m feeling tonight? Happy and Sad at the same time.” Maybe the answer to that question is “human” as I think we all feel this way sometimes. Another great example of her songwriting is seen in “Butterflies.”  While the common expression of “you give me butterflies” is included in the lyrics, the meaning behind the butterfly is much more complex. Someone has finally untangled the strings around her wings so that she can fly, much like a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis. Although I find it hard to believe that Kacey was ever a caterpillar, I’m glad she’s now a butterfly! In “Space Cowboy” we see Kacey engaging in wordplay. This song isn’t about an astronaut John Wayne but rather it’s about giving a cowboy his space. Clever, Kacey! 

A central theme weaving its way throughout this album is love, not just romantic love, but also love of the world (“Oh, What A World“) and love for one’s mother (“Mother“). Kacey finding love and her recent marriage to fellow musician Ruston Kelly may have something to do with the abundance of love flowing through this record. We can hear this in songs like “Love is a Wild Thing,” “Butterflies,” and in the album’s title track, “Golden Hour.” I reckon Ruston Kelly is also her “Velvet Elvis” (she must be his “Velvet Priscilla”).  

This past week, Kacey has been posting sound clips of her songs on Instagram along with short descriptions to go along with the songs. For the song’s first track, “Slow Burn,” she provides some background on the song for her listeners, saying “I was born 6 weeks early. Under 5 lbs. I came on the day of my baby shower. [I always have loved a party] It was the last time I was ever early for anything. SLOW BURN is one of my most auto-biographical songs. And one of my favorites. It was the last one @tronian [Ian Fitchuk] + @thesilverseas [Daniel Tashian] and I wrote and it’s the first song on the new record. Arriving 3/30” And for my favorite, “Oh, What A World,” she says, “I refuse to let the ugliness of the modern world make me forget about the mystery and beauty that surrounds us on a daily basis. OH, WHAT A WORLD was the first song we wrote for the album and it set the sonic pathway I decided to chase. Futurism: meet traditionalism. Vocoder: meet pedal steel and banjo. Full album: meet everyone on 3/30.

On a sonic level, this album is easy on the ears. “Lonely Weekend” sounds like the song you’d want to listen to on a lonely weekend. And “Happy & Sad” has a sound that’s almost familiar, like you’ve maybe heard it before but can’t remember where. I already commented on the “trippy” sound of “Oh, What A World” above and as Kacey says, this song set the “sonic pathway” for the album. Golden Hour’s sound is different from what we heard on her first two albums and that’s not a bad thing AT ALL. Kudos to Kacey for taking a creative leap with these sounds as it paid off in a major way- this is an excellent album- it’s lyrically, sonically, and creatively beautiful! 

If you’re thinking that this album isn’t “country,” you’re right. It’s not a country album, it’s a Kacey album. Even before songs were released from this album, we were told that it would be influenced by the Bee Gees, Sade, and Neil Young.  If the trippy, disco-infused sounds and the clever songwriting found on this album don’t appeal to you then you can hop on your “High Horse” and “giddy up, giddy up and ride straight out of this town!” 

Track Listing:

1. Slow Burn
2. Lonely Weekend
3. Butterflies
4. Oh, What A World
5. Mother
6. Love Is A Wild Thing
7. Space Cowboy
8. Happy & Sad

9. Velvet Elvis
10. Wonder Woman
11. High Horse

12. Golden Hour
13. Rainbow 

Happy Album Release Day, Kacey! Thank you for this beautiful album! I hope your album is getting all of the love it deserves. Don’t forget to check out the new album, along with all of Kacey’s great songs, on my “A Very Kacey Playlist.” 

Currently listening to: This album obviously. Though I should be brushing up on some Dashboard Confessional since I’m seeing them in concert tomorrow night at the Fillmore in Silver Spring. It’s pretty coincidental because Chris Carrabba, the band’s lead singer, was credited as being one of Kacey’s songwriting heroes at an exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum not too long ago. Other songwriters on that list included John Prine (duh!), Loretta Lynn, Roger Miller, Neil Young, Buddy and Julie Miller, and Jim Croce.

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Kacey in front of her songwriting heroes (Photo courtesy of Dashboard Confessional’s Facebook page)